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Gourmet Magazine’s pomegranate gelato is strawberry ice cream’s sultry, brooding cousin. It’s also super easy to make. Here’s how to do it.

pomegranate gelato in a pretty blue and green bowl
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Why we love this recipe

Cheers to the erstwhile Gourmet Magazine, which coexisted with Umami Girl for only a few years. Their easy pomegranate gelato is still in our regular rotation. I especially love to serve it at fall and winter dinner parties. It feels so seasonal that you’d never guess it’s made with good old bottled pomegranate juice. 

This gelato is:

  • Smooth and creamy
  • Lightly sweet and gently tangy
  • Make-ahead friendly
  • So much easier than you may think

I first published this recipe here in 2009 (adapted from a 2006 issue of Gourmet). I’ve updated the post for clarity, but the recipe remains the same.

What you’ll need

Here’s a glance at the ingredients you’ll need to make this recipe.

ingredients in bowls
  • A combination of heavy cream and whole milk creates a just-rich-enough texture that’s not overwhelming.
  • Bottled pomegranate juice makes things easy and accessible.
  • Crème de cassis is blackcurrant liqueur. It’s widely available, but if you can’t find it or don’t have an open bottle, you can substitute pomegranate liqueur or a fruity dessert wine.
  • Cornstarch imparts both a bit of thickness and a bit of silkiness to the mixture.

How to make it

Here’s what you’ll do to make a great batch of pomegranate gelato. You can see the steps in action in the video that accompanies this post, and get all the details in the recipe card below.

step by step
  1. First, whisk together the cream, milk, sugar, cornstarch, and salt in a medium pot.
  2. Bring to a boil, then simmer for two minutes, whisking constantly.
  3. Pour into a bowl and stir in pomegranate juice, crème de cassis, and lemon juice. Chill for at least an hour.
  4. Pour into an ice cream maker and churn according to manufacturer’s instructions. Gelato is ready to serve. It will be soft and delicious at this stage. You can also place it into a pint container and freeze for a few hours — up to a few days — for a more solid consistency.

Expert tips and FAQs

What’s the difference between gelato and ice cream?

There are a few key differences. Gelato typically has a higher ratio of milk to cream and doesn’t contain egg yolks. It tends to feel creamier, denser, and silkier despite a lower fat content, with more underlying flavor shining through. You can read more here.

What is crème de cassis, and how else can I use it?

It’s a sweet liqueur made from black currants and traditionally comes from the French town Dijon in Burgundy. Stir it into white wine for a Kir or into sparkling wine for a Kir Royale. And splash a bit into your next fruit salad to subtly elevate that simple dish.

Can I make pomegranate gelato in advance?

The texture of homemade gelato is best when made and consumed within a few days. You have a few options for making ahead.

You can make the mixture up to a week in advance and refrigerate, then churn just before serving for a softer consistency or three to four hours before serving for a firmer scoop. Or churn up to three days in advance and let sit for five minutes at room temperature before scooping.

More favorite frozen fruit desserts

pomegranate gelato in a pretty blue and green bowl

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pomegranate gelato in a pretty blue and green bowl
4.67 from 3 votes

Gourmet Magazine’s Pomegranate Gelato

By Carolyn Gratzer Cope
Gourmet magazine’s pomegranate gelato is strawberry ice cream’s sultry, brooding cousin. This recipe makes a little less than a quart of gelato.
Prep: 30 minutes
Cook: 5 minutes
Additional Time: 4 hours
Total: 4 hours 35 minutes
Servings: 8
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Ingredients 

  • 1 cup (237 ml) heavy cream
  • 1 cup (237 ml) whole milk
  • ¾ cup (133 grams) sugar
  • 1 ½ tablespoons (12 grams) cornstarch
  • teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 ¼ cups (296 ml) bottled pomegranate juice
  • cup (79 ml) creme de cassis, pomegranate liqueur or fruit dessert wine
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

Instructions 

  • In a medium pot, whisk together the cream, milk, sugar, cornstarch, and salt.
  • Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, whisking occasionally.
  • When the mixture boils, reduce the heat to maintain a lively simmer and cook, whisking constantly, for two minutes.
  • Scrape the mixture into a medium bowl and add the pomegranate juice, liqueur or wine and lemon juice. Whisk to combine thoroughly.
  • Chill the mixture for at least an hour, either in the fridge or by carefully setting the bowl into a larger bowl of ice water and stirring occasionally.
  • Freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The gelato will be very soft (although perfectly edible!) at this point and will firm up if transferred to an airtight container and placed in the freezer for a few hours.

Notes

  1. A combination of heavy cream and whole milk creates a just-rich-enough texture that’s not overwhelming.
  2. Bottled pomegranate juice makes things easy and accessible.
  3. Crème de cassis is blackcurrant liqueur. It’s widely available, but if you can’t find it or don’t have an open bottle, you can substitute pomegranate liqueur or a fruity dessert wine.
  4. Cornstarch imparts both a bit of thickness and a bit of silkiness to the mixture.
  5. The texture of homemade gelato is best when made and consumed within a few days. You have a few options for making ahead. You can make the mixture up to a week in advance and refrigerate, then churn just before serving for a softer consistency or three to four hours before serving for a firmer scoop. Or churn up to three days in advance and let sit for five minutes at room temperature before scooping.
I first published this recipe here in 2009. I’ve updated the post for clarity, but the recipe remains the same. Adapted from Gourmet Magazine September, 2006.

Nutrition

Calories: 219kcal, Carbohydrates: 27.6g, Protein: 1.9g, Fat: 11.8g, Fiber: 0.1g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Frozen Desserts
Cuisine: Italian
Tried this recipe?Mention @umamigirl or tag #umamigirl!

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

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Carolyn Gratzer Cope Bio Photo

About Carolyn Gratzer Cope

Hi there, I'm Carolyn Gratzer Cope, founder and publisher of Umami Girl. Join me in savoring life, one recipe at a time. I'm a professional recipe developer with training from the French Culinary Institute (now ICE) and a lifetime of studying, appreciating, and sharing food.

4.67 from 3 votes (3 ratings without comment)

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6 Comments

  1. Absolutely gorgeous photos, UmamiGirl! :o)
    I feel your pain about the loss of a fave mag… you know me well…so sadly for me its not Gormet! HA… but something a little dorkier. But still, I feel ya!