This post may contain affiliate links. Learn more.

Deviled ham is old-school to be sure. This super-easy spread or sandwich filling tastes delicious and is a great way to use up leftover cooked ham when you’ve exhausted all your other options — or just because you love it.

deviled ham in a bowl and on a toasted piece of baguette
Want to save this recipe?
Enter your email below and I’ll send it to your inbox. Plus get great new recipes every week!
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

Why we love this recipe

A fun activity is to tell someone that you made deviled ham and watch their face react. If that’s not enough reason to try this recipe, here are a few more:

  • It’s savory and delicious as a spread or sandwich filling (promise)
  • It’s so retro that it goes back to the days of the Civil War. The logo on the Underwood deviled ham can was trademarked in 1870 and is now the oldest food-related trademark still in use in the U.S.
  • Our version is extra-flavorful (and highly customizable)

I first published this recipe here way back in 2010. If you’re a fan of quirky old-school blog narrative, scroll down below the recipe card to read the original text. Our circumstances may have changed over the years, but my feelings about deviled ham remain the same — as does the recipe.

What you’ll need

Here’s a glance at the ingredients you’ll need to make this recipe. It looks like a lot, but you probably have most of it in your pantry already.

ingredients in bowls
  • You can use leftover spiral cut ham from the holidays or a good quality smoked ham. You could also make this recipe with deli ham, but it’s not the intended ingredient. Please note: I’ve listed this recipe as gluten-free, but that’s only true if your ham is gluten-free. If it matters to you and your guests, please confirm.
  • There are three kinds of mustard in this recipe: dry, dijon, and grainy. If you don’t have all of them, that’s okay. Just double up on the ones you have.
  • The base recipe isn’t very spicy, but you’re more than welcome to add as much additional hot sauce as you like. Tabasco works well, but you can use your favorite kind.
  • The only fresh ingredients in this recipe are onion, lemon juice, and parsley. They really lift the flavor profile, so don’t skip any of them or use jarred substitutes.

How to make it

Here’s an overview of how to make deviled ham. Gathering the ingredients is the hardest part! You can see the steps in action in the video that accompanies this post, and get all the details in the recipe card below.

step by step
  1. Cut leftover cooked ham into cubes and place them in a food processor.
  2. Add all the other ingredients.
  3. You can control the spiciness by deciding how much hot sauce to use.
  4. Process until smooth and spreadable. Chill for at least two hours before serving.

Expert tips and FAQs

How do you serve deviled ham?

This recipe works well as a spread for crackers, toasted baguette slices, or bagels. It’s also great as a sandwich filling. Try it with lettuce, tomato, and mayo.

Got any variations?

The base recipe is pureed until smooth and spreadable, but you can alter it if you like. You could use the food processor just to chop the ham fairly finely and then mix up the other ingredients as a dressing and stir together to make a salad. In this version, try adding two ribs of finely chopped celery, too.

Can I make this recipe in advance? What about leftovers?

Definitely. I recommend making deviled ham at least two hours in advance to let the flavors mingle as it chills. It keeps well in an airtight container in the fridge for a week, so feel free to make it in advance and take your time using up leftovers.

More favorite recipes with ham

deviled ham in a bowl and on a toasted piece of baguette

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

deviled ham in a bowl and on a toasted piece of baguette
4.72 from 7 votes

Deviled Ham

By Carolyn Gratzer Cope
Deviled ham is old-school to be sure. This super-easy spread or sandwich filling tastes delicious and is a great way to use up leftover cooked ham when you've exhausted all your other options — or just because you love it.
Prep: 15 minutes
Additional Time: 2 hours
Total: 2 hours 15 minutes
Servings: 2.5 cups
Want to save this recipe?
Enter your email and I’ll send it to your inbox. Plus get great new recipes every week!
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

Ingredients 

  • ¾ pounds (340 grams) leftover spiral-sliced or smoked ham, cut into 1/2-inch pieces?
  • ½ cup (60 grams) mayonnaise?
  • 1 tablespoon (15 grams) spicy brown mustard?
  • 1 tablespoon (15 grams) Dijon mustard
  • ½ cup (50 grams) chopped yellow onion?
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon?
  • 2 tablespoons (30 grams) drained capers
  • 1 ½ tablespoons (23 ml) Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons (10 grams) minced fresh flat-leaf parsley (use leaves picked from stems)
  • 2 teaspoons sweet Hungarian paprika
  • 20 dashes Tabasco or other hot sauce, plus more to taste?
  • ½ teaspoon celery seed
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon mustard powder

Instructions 

  • Place all ingredients in a food processor fitted with the blade.
  • Blend until smooth, stopping to scrape down the sides as necessary.
  • Refrigerate for a couple of hours to let the flavors commune, if possible.
  • Serve as a spread for crackers or a filling for sandwiches.

Notes

  1. You can use leftover spiral cut ham from the holidays or a good quality smoked ham. You could also make this recipe with deli ham, but it's not the intended ingredient. Please note: I've listed this recipe as gluten-free, but that's only true if your ham is gluten-free. If it matters to you and your guests, please confirm.
  2. There are three kinds of mustard in this recipe: dry, dijon, and grainy. If you don't have all of them, that's okay. Just double up on the ones you have.
  3. The base recipe isn't very spicy, but you're more than welcome to add as much additional hot sauce as you like. Tabasco works well, but you can use your favorite kind.
  4. The only fresh ingredients in this recipe are onion, lemon juice, and parsley. They really lift the flavor profile, so don't skip any of them or use jarred substitutes.
  5. This recipe works well as a spread for crackers, toasted baguette slices, or bagels. It's also great as a sandwich filling. Try it with lettuce, tomato, and mayo.
  6. The base recipe is pureed until smooth and spreadable, but you can alter it if you like. You could use the food processor just to chop the ham fairly finely and then mix up the other ingredients as a dressing and stir together to make a salad. In this version, try adding two ribs of finely chopped celery, too.
  7. I recommend making deviled ham at least two hours in advance to let the flavors mingle as it chills. It keeps well in an airtight container in the fridge for a week, so feel free to make it in advance and take your time using up leftovers.
    I first published this recipe here in 2010. I've since updated the post for clarity, but the recipe remains the same. Adapted from Food Network.

Nutrition

Calories: 132kcal, Carbohydrates: 1.7g, Protein: 8.6g, Fat: 9.6g, Fiber: 0.4g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Snacks and Starters
Cuisine: American
Tried this recipe?Mention @umamigirl or tag #umamigirl!

Original text from 2010

If eternity is two people and a ham, it only begs the question: what happens when you devil it?

When I told the kindergartner we’d be having ham again for dinner, she broke down in tears. I wish I were kidding, but there was actual passing of eye water, to paraphrase a line from 30 Rock. I caved, and she had peanut butter and jelly for dinner instead.

Given that the littlest one had already gone to bed, that left just two of us to tackle the remains of last week’s whole spiral cut ham for dinner. And you know what they say about two people and a ham.

A recipe of last resort

Believe me, we’d already tried hard to have our way with the thing. The first two nights were pure delight. Oh, ham! Salty, sweet, meaty—we haven’t done this in a while. Night three? Aside from the feeling I got describing it over the phone to the lovely Suzanne, who keeps Kosher, we were perfectly pleased with our casserole of leftover brown rice and broccoli flecked with ham and baked in a cheesy béchamel sauce.

Night four was automatically disqualified as a Friday in Lent with the grandparents visiting. (Are you starting to see a pattern here? Something to do with organized religion as a Ham Avoidance Mechanism (HAM)? Whoa.)

A certain WTF caché

By the weekend, we needed a new strategy. Or should I say a new-old one? We needed to take radical action. And holy ham, did we ever.

I’m a big fan of deviled eggs. Also of retro-chic. 

So in a sense, it was only natural to happen upon the idea of taming the beast by deviling. In a different (perhaps more compelling) sense, though, I think deviled ham will always carry a certain WTF caché.

All in all, I’d have to say the Deviled Ham Project was successful. It comes together in a snap and makes a tasty and umami-rich spread for crackers or filling for sandwiches. 

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

Hungry for More?
Subscribe to Umami Girl's email updates, and follow along on Instagram.
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

More Recipes

Carolyn Gratzer Cope Bio Photo

About Carolyn Gratzer Cope

Hi there, I'm Carolyn Gratzer Cope, founder and publisher of Umami Girl. Join me in savoring life, one recipe at a time. I'm a professional recipe developer with training from the French Culinary Institute (now ICE) and a lifetime of studying, appreciating, and sharing food.

4.72 from 7 votes (7 ratings without comment)

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




10 Comments

  1. Couldnt find a recipe for deviled ham in any cooking books Got an insperation and WALLA the internet came to my rescue ,Thanks for the help

  2. Here is a good tip for this recipe, just replace the ham by some jamon iberico de bellota, in case you do not know it this is probably the best ham in the world, it is extremely tasty and healthy (no cholesterol), it comes from a particular breed of swine only found in Spain and Portugal. While it is a bit pricey, the results on the recipe are just amazing. If you want to keep it low budget, buy some Serrano ham which is also great.
    I always buy my iberico ham online at Buyjamon.com as it is fresh and delivered to your door.

    BuyJamon.com the market place for iberico ham.

  3. I use to love deviled ham as a kid – you know the kind in a can. I can only imagine how much better this is. Oh, I have a big craving now!

  4. Yes! It made it. Hurray! The cousin of pottage cheese with a dark side. But also yummy, savory – and of all things a meat spread not made of liver! I think it has inspired me to want to make ham salad just in time for…..Passover? Hmmn….on matzo toast points?

  5. You’re a brave woman to cook a large ham during lent…the deviled ham looks delicious–perfect for a luxurious summer picnic.

  6. My name in print…I’m famous. Even though I can’t use this recipe, I passed it along to someone else who can’t wait to try it!