This post may contain affiliate links. Learn more.

Prosciutto and arugula pizza layers a really excellent classic cheese pizza with thin, silky slices of prosciutto, tangy arugula salad, and balsamic drizzle.

prosciutto and arugula pizza on a cutting board
Want to save this recipe?
Enter your email below and I’ll send it to your inbox. Plus get great new recipes every week!
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

Why we love this recipe

This pizza — and, honestly, the course of my adulthood — is heavily inspired by our visit to the original Primo Restaurant in Rockland, Maine, decades ago. Primo was pretty new at the time, as was the farm-to-table restaurant movement, if you can believe that. We loved that place so much. It was a revelation for us at that moment, and I went on to get a lot of satisfaction from watching the rest of the country have a similar revelation in the few years after.

Our meal at Primo began with a perfect prosciutto arugula pizza that I thought about virtually every day for years afterward. (That says a lot about the pizza, and at least as much about me, I realize.)

At this point I can’t remember exactly how closely my version tracks the original, but time and distance allowed me to create exactly the pizza I wanted. It’s got:

  • My favorite New York-style crust
  • Just enough of a really good tomato sauce and regular old, nothing fancy mozzarella
  • And then (!) — thin slices of prosciutto draped on top
  • A big mess of punchy arugula dressed in good olive oil, fresh lemon juice, flaky sea salt and black pepper
  • Judicious shards of good parmesan
  • A sweet drizzle of balsamic glaze

This pizza feels special but really couldn’t be easier. The recipe finally made it to Umami Girl back in 2017. I’ve since updated the post for clarity and altered the quantities a bit, but the recipe otherwise remains the same.

What you’ll need

Here’s a glance at the ingredients you’ll need to make this recipe.

ingredients in bowls
  • You can start with purchased pizza dough or make your own. I’ve linked my favorite recipe for New York-style crust below. This recipe works with any size and style of pizza you’d like to make.
  • You’ll make a nice, thick sauce by stirring together equal parts marinara and tomato paste. This gives you tons of flavor and no unwanted moisture.
  • A combination of shredded low-moisture mozzarella and good-quality grated parmesan provides a gently amplified version of that classic cheese pizza vibe. This combo is easy to work with as long as you don’t overdo it. Shred and grate the cheeses yourself to avoid additives that will prevent your pizza from tasting and behaving its best. You’ll also use a vegetable peeler to slice some of the parmesan over the top of the pizza before serving.
  • Properly sliced prosciutto should be on the thin side but not so thin that it falls apart. Use any variety that you enjoy eating. I like to drape it over the pizza slices just before serving, but you can slice it into ribbons and bake it with the pizza if you prefer.
  • A lightly dressed arugula salad piled high in the middle of this pizza contributes a bright, peppery dimension. Arugula varies a lot in flavor and intensity throughout the year and across brands, so find one that you like. You’ll dress it simply with some olive oil, freshly squeezed lemon juice, flaky salt, and pepper.
  • You can make your own balsamic glaze by simmering regular balsamic vinegar until it’s thick and syrupy, but I usually just buy it in a bottle. We like drizzling it over everything from salads to steak, so it never goes to waste.
  • An equal mixture of cornmeal and semolina flour works beautifully to help your pizza slide onto and off of the peel.

How to make it

Here’s an overview of what you’ll do to make a fabulous prosciutto and arugula pizza. You can see the steps in action in the video that accompanies this post, and get all the details in the recipe card below.

step by step
  1. First you’ll stretch the dough, spread on the sauce, and sprinkle on the cheeses.
  2. Bake until dough is cooked through, and slice. Drape a piece of prosciutto over each slice.
  3. Toss the arugula with the olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Pile the salad into the center of the pizza.
  4. Drizzle with balsamic glaze, top with thin pieces of parmesan, and sprinkle with flaky salt. That’s it!

Pizza protips

Here are a few secrets to success with homemade pizza.

  • You can use purchased or homemade pizza dough. Here’s my favorite recipe for New York-style crust. It makes two 14-inch pies or four 10-inch pies.
  • Use thick sauce. Mixing one part marinara with one part tomato paste creates a spreadable, rich-tasting sauce that won’t slosh around.
  • A combination of shredded low-moisture mozzarella and really good grated parmesan adds tons of flavor and classic cheesy vibes. If you’d like to work with fresh mozzarella, keep in mind that it adds a lot of moisture, and use it sparingly.
  • Top your pizzas judiciously. If you share my more-is-more inclinations, this can be harder than it sounds. But it’s important to exercise a bit of restraint to yield the best possible pizzas.
  • Transferring your pizza onto a peel and into the oven takes a bit of practice, and that’s okay. You can use a mixture of cornmeal and semolina flour or, if baking in a regular home oven, a piece of parchment. The process gets easier over time. I recommend this metal peel or this wooden one.
  • If using your oven, crank it up as high as it goes (typically 500-550°F), with a rack in the center. Consider investing in a pizza stone, which retains heat like a dream and helps you create crisp, tender crust.
  • If you’re looking for a countertop pizza oven, I recommend the Breville Smart Oven Pizzaiolo. It’s pricey and takes up quite a bit of counter space, but it gets much hotter than a home oven and really enables you make pro-level pizza at home.

Expert tips and FAQs

Can I make this recipe in advance? What about leftovers?

If making your own dough, you’ll need to start at least 24 hours in advance. Assemble, bake, and dress the pizza right before serving.

If you have leftovers, remove any dressed greens — they won’t keep well. Store pizza in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a couple of days. By far my favorite way to reheat and re-crisp pizza is in the toaster oven. You can use a regular oven if that’s what you’ve got.

More favorite pizzas

prosciutto and arugula pizza on a cutting board and a plate

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

prosciutto and arugula pizza on a cutting board
5 from 12 votes

Prosciutto Arugula Pizza

By Carolyn Gratzer Cope
Prosciutto and arugula pizza layers a really excellent classic cheese pizza with thin, silky slices of prosciutto, tangy arugula salad, and balsamic drizzle. Quantities listed here are for one 10-inch pie (which feeds one to two people). Double them for a large pie.
Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 10 minutes
Total: 30 minutes
Servings: 1 10-inch pizza
Want to save this recipe?
Enter your email and I’ll send it to your inbox. Plus get great new recipes every week!
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

Ingredients 

For the pizza

  • 1 6- ounce 170-gram dough ball
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) marinara sauce
  • 2 tablespoons (33 grams) tomato paste
  • 2 ounces (57 grams) low-moisture mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 2 tablespoons (10 grams) grated parmesan cheese
  • 2 ounces (57 grams) arugula
  • 2 teaspoons (10 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons (10 ml) freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • ¼ teaspoon flaky sea salt
  • teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 thin slices prosciutto, halved crosswise
  • 1 ounce (28 grams) parmesan cheese
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) balsamic glaze

For the work surface

  • 1 tablespoon (12 grams) coarsely ground cornmeal
  • 1 tablespoon (12 grams) semolina flour

Instructions 

  • Preheat oven to 550°F (or as high as it goes) with a rack in the center. If you have a pizza stone, preheat it on the center rack. (If not, you can use an overturned half sheet pan.)
  • Stir together the cornmeal and semolina flour. Distribute half of the mixture over your work surface.
  • Stretch the dough into a 10-inch round and place on prepared work surface.
  • Stir together the marinara sauce and tomato paste, then spread evenly over dough, leaving a border around the circumference.
  • Sprinkle on the mozzarella and then the parmesan in an even layer.
  • Sprinkle remaining cornmeal mixture over peel. Nudge peel under pizza and use it to transfer pizza to preheated stone.
  • Bake until dough is cooked through, about 6 to 10 minutes depending on your oven.
  • Slice into eight pieces and drape a piece of prosciutto over each.
  • In a medium mixing bowl, toss the arugula with the olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper.
  • Heap arugula salad onto the center of the pizza.
  • Use a vegetable peeler to then shower thin curls of parmesan over the salad and pizza.
  • Drizzle with balsamic glaze and sprinkle with additional flaky salt and pepper if you like.

Notes

  1. You can start with purchased pizza dough or make your own.
  2. You'll make a nice, thick sauce by stirring together equal parts marinara and tomato paste. This gives you tons of flavor and no unwanted moisture.
  3. A combination of shredded low-moisture mozzarella and good-quality grated parmesan provides a gently amplified version of that classic cheese pizza vibe. This combo is easy to work with as long as you don't overdo it. Shred and grate the cheeses yourself to avoid additives that will prevent your pizza from tasting and behaving its best. You'll also use a vegetable peeler to slice some of the parmesan over the top of the pizza before serving. 
  4. Properly sliced prosciutto should be on the thin side but not so thin that it falls apart. Use any variety that you enjoy eating. I like to drape it over the pizza slices just before serving, but you can slice it into ribbons and bake it with the pizza if you prefer.
  5. A lightly dressed arugula salad piled high in the middle of this pizza contributes a bright, peppery dimension. Arugula varies a lot in flavor and intensity throughout the year and across brands, so find one that you like. You'll dress it simply with some olive oil, freshly squeezed lemon juice, flaky salt, and pepper.
  6. You can make your own balsamic glaze by simmering regular balsamic vinegar until it's thick and syrupy, but I usually just buy it in a bottle. We like drizzling it over everything from salads to steak, so it never goes to waste.
  7. An equal mixture of cornmeal and semolina flour works beautifully to help your pizza slide onto and off of the peel.
  8. If making your own dough, you'll need to start at least 24 hours in advance. Assemble, bake, and dress the pizza right before serving. 
  9. If you have leftovers, remove any dressed greens — they won't keep well. Store pizza in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a couple of days. By far my favorite way to reheat and re-crisp pizza is in the toaster oven. You can use a regular oven if that's what you've got.

Nutrition

Calories: 369kcal, Carbohydrates: 50.1g, Protein: 17g, Fat: 8.3g, Fiber: 3g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Pizza
Cuisine: Italian
Tried this recipe?Mention @umamigirl or tag #umamigirl!

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

Hungry for More?
Subscribe to Umami Girl's email updates, and follow along on Instagram.
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

More Recipes

Carolyn Gratzer Cope Bio Photo

About Carolyn Gratzer Cope

Hi there, I'm Carolyn Gratzer Cope, founder and publisher of Umami Girl. Join me in savoring life, one recipe at a time. I'm a professional recipe developer with training from the French Culinary Institute (now ICE) and a lifetime of studying, appreciating, and sharing food.

5 from 12 votes (12 ratings without comment)

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating