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These savory, silky bacon and gruyere egg bites are a spot-on way to satisfy your Starbucks cravings, made right in your own oven. Also includes sous-vide and Instant Pot instructions.

bacon and gruyere egg bites on a small wooden board
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Why we love this recipe

From time to time, a particular takeout meal will wend its way into my heart and turn itself into a ritual. A venti unsweetened passion iced tea and bacon and gruyere egg bites from Starbucks has long been on that list. This recipe lets you make that magic happen at home, anytime you like. These egg bites are:

  • Silky and tender
  • Full of savory, satisfying flavors
  • Perfect as is, but flexible, too — swap ingredients in or out
  • Easy to make in the oven, or you can sous vide or pressure cook them

Adapted from Starbucks.

What you’ll need

Here’s a glance at the ingredients you’ll need to make this recipe.

ingredients in bowls
  • You can use any eggs you like, but sourcing good ones makes all the difference in such a simple recipe. Nothing beats the gorgeous golden yolk of a fresh egg from a well-treated hen. I’ve devoted a whole section to helping you parse the details.
  • Your favorite bacon will work just fine here, whatever it is. Sometimes I gravitate toward super thick-cut varieties, but here it’s not necessary. (The package pictured is delicious and quite a bit thicker than standard supermarket bacon, but would not be confused for a steak.)
  • Gruyere instantly elevates a simple recipe with its umami-forward, nutty, slightly funky flavor. If you’d rather, you can substitute another semi-hard cheese that melts well, like cheddar, provolone, fontina, or Swiss. Starbucks uses a combination of gruyere and jack cheeses, but I prefer the stronger flavor of an all-gruyere bite.
  • A little bit of cornstarch keeps the egg bites very soft by preventing the eggs’ proteins from seizing up. If you prefer, you can use an equal measure of potato starch.
  • Cottage cheese is the secret ingredient that makes the original sous vide egg bites so delectable. Its tanginess and creaminess bring a lot to the table in terms of both flavor and texture. For years, my favorite cottage cheese by far has been good old Friendship brand with 1% milk fat. It works beautifully in this recipe, but you can use whatever kind you like.
  • A hint of Tabasco adds remarkable depth of flavor, without reading as spicy. If you have a different favorite vinegary hot sauce, you’re welcome to use that instead.

Sourcing eggs

The least-complicated (though often not the most convenient) way to source great eggs is to buy from local farmers whom you know and trust, either directly from the farm or at a farmers’ market or small grocery store.

If you’re shopping at a U.S. supermarket, things can get a little more complicated. Here’s a quick guide to the terminology that will and won’t help you choose the best eggs you can afford.

Words that mean something

  • Organic
  • Pastured (best) or free-range
  • USDA A or AA
  • Certified Humane or Animal Welfare Approved seals

Words that don’t mean anything

  • Natural (anything can be called natural)
  • Vegetarian-fed (chickens are natural omnivores)
  • No added hormones (this is required by the government)
  • Antibiotic-free (chickens are rarely medicated with antibiotics)

My favorite sources for meat & pantry staples

For years, I’ve been sourcing our meat from ButcherBox. We love this curated meat delivery service, which provides grass-finished beef, heritage breed pork, organic chicken, and more from small farms direct to the customer. You can learn more in my extensive Butcher Box review and unboxing.

I love Thrive Market for a wide variety of products. Often described as one part Whole Foods, one part Costco, they’re a membership-based online market for healthier products at discounted prices. Plus, they’re mission-driven, engaged in the community, and not currently owned by a giant corporation. You can learn more in my Thrive Market review and unboxing.

How to make it

Here’s an overview of what you’ll do to make a batch of bacon and gruyere egg bites. You can see the steps in action in the video that accompanies this post, and get all the details in the recipe card below.

step by step
  1. First you’ll chop and cook the bacon and shred the gruyere.
  2. Blend the eggs, cottage cheese, gruyere, cornstarch, Tabasco, salt, and pepper until perfectly smooth.
  3. Pour mixture into greased muffin cups and top with bacon.
  4. Bake in a water bath (see recipe card for details). That’s it!

Sous vide instructions

  • Instead of a muffin tin, you’ll use 12 4-ounce canning jars with two-piece lids.
  • Spray the jars with cooking spray and fill each with 1/4 cup of egg mixture, then add bacon.
  • Screw the lids on just to finger-tightness (i.e. not super-tight, so air will be able to escape — this is very important for safety).
  • Once closed, submerge the jars in your water bath.
  • Set your sous vide cooker to 172°F (77.8°C) and cook for one hour.
  • You can spoon the egg bites directly out of the jars, or run a knife around the edges and remove them before serving.

Instant Pot instructions

  • You’ll need two silicone egg bites pans and a 6- or 8-quart Instant Pot.
  • Pour one cup of water into the bottom of the IP and set the trivet in the bottom.
  • Spray the cups with cooking spray and fill each with a bit less than 1/4 cup of egg mixture, then add bacon.
  • Cover each filled egg pan with its silicone lid and stack the pans into the IP.
  • Position IP lid, seal vent, and cook on low pressure for 10 minutes. (Pot will take a while to come up to pressure before the countdown starts.)
  • Let pressure release naturally for five minutes before performing a manual release.

Expert tips and FAQs

Can you freeze egg bites?

Yup! Once fully cooled, transfer bites to a parchment-lined baking sheet and freeze until solid, then transfer to an airtight container and keep frozen for up to a year. You can defrost them overnight in the fridge and reheat according to the directions below, or reheat straight from frozen, which will take several minutes in the microwave at half power.

Can I make this recipe in advance? What about leftovers?

Yes. Egg bites will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for a week. Reheat (if you like) with a brief stint in the microwave — typically about 60 seconds at half power, depending on your model. Or see freezing instructions above.

More favorite soft egg recipes

bacon and gruyere egg bites on a small wooden board

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bacon and gruyere egg bites on a small wooden board
5 from 3 votes

Bacon and Gruyere Egg Bites

By Carolyn Gratzer Cope
These savory, silky bacon and gruyere egg bites are a spot-on way to satisfy your Starbucks cravings, made right in your own oven.
Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 20 minutes
Total: 40 minutes
Servings: 12 egg bites
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Ingredients 

  • 10 ounces (283 grams) bacon
  • 1 cup (235 grams) cottage cheese
  • 4 ounces (113 grams) gruyere cheese
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon (8 grams) cornstarch
  • ¼ teaspoon Tabasco
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Instructions 

  • Preheat oven to 325°F with a rack in the center and a rimmed half-sheet pan on the rack.
  • Chop the bacon into bite-sized pieces and place into a cold 10-inch frying pan.
  • Place pan onto burner and set heat to medium.
  • Cook, stirring from time to time, until lightly crisp.
  • Remove bacon from pan and drain on paper towel.
  • Shred the gruyere on the large holes of a box grater.
  • Crack the eggs into a blender. Add the cottage cheese, shredded gruyere, cornstarch, Tabasco, salt, and pepper.
  • Blend until perfectly smooth.
  • Spray a standard 12-cup muffin tin with cooking spray.
  • Divide egg mixture among muffin cups — you'll use 1/4 cup of mixture per muffin.
  • Divide bacon among muffin cups.
  • Place the muffin tin onto the sheet pan. Very carefully pour boiling water into the sheet pan to a depth of about 1/2 inch.
  • Bake for about 20 minutes, until bites are set and starting to pull away from the edges of the pan.
  • Carefully remove muffin tin from oven and place onto a wire rack set over a kitchen towel to cool for five to ten minutes.
  • Run a knife around the edges of the egg bites and remove them from the muffin cups. Serve warm.

Notes

  1. Your favorite bacon will work just fine here, whatever it is. Sometimes I gravitate toward super thick-cut varieties, but here it's not necessary. (The package pictured is delicious and quite a bit thicker than standard supermarket bacon, but would not be confused for a steak.)
  2. Gruyere instantly elevates a simple recipe with its umami-forward, nutty, slightly funky flavor. If you'd rather, you can substitute another semi-hard cheese that melts well, like cheddar, provolone, fontina, or Swiss. Starbucks uses a combination of gruyere and jack cheeses, but I prefer the stronger flavor of an all-gruyere bite.
  3. A little bit of cornstarch keeps the egg bites very soft by preventing the eggs' proteins from seizing up. If you prefer, you can use an equal measure of potato starch.
  4. Cottage cheese is the secret ingredient that makes the original sous vide egg bites so delectable. Its tanginess and creaminess bring a lot to the table in terms of both flavor and texture. For years, my favorite cottage cheese by far has been good old Friendship brand with 1% milk fat. It works beautifully in this recipe, but you can use whatever kind you like.
  5. A hint of Tabasco adds remarkable depth of flavor, without reading as spicy. If you have a different favorite vinegary hot sauce, you're welcome to use that instead.
  6. Egg bites will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for a week. Reheat (if you like) with a brief stint in the microwave — typically about 60 seconds at half power, depending on your model. Or see freezing instructions above.
  7. To freeze: Once fully cooled, transfer bites to a parchment-lined baking sheet and freeze until solid, then transfer to an airtight container and keep frozen for up to a year. You can defrost them overnight in the fridge and reheat according to the directions below, or reheat straight from frozen, which will take several minutes in the microwave at half power.

Sous vide instructions

  • Instead of a muffin tin, you'll use 12 4-ounce canning jars with two-piece lids.
  • Spray the jars with cooking spray and fill each with 1/4 cup of egg mixture, then add bacon.
  • Screw the lids on just to finger-tightness (i.e. not super-tight, so air will be able to escape — this is very important for safety).
  • Once closed, submerge the jars in your water bath.
  • Set your sous vide cooker to 172°F (77.8°C) and cook for one hour.
  • You can spoon the egg bites directly out of the jars, or run a knife around the edges and remove them before serving.

Instant Pot instructions

  • You'll need two silicone egg bites pans and a 6- or 8-quart Instant Pot.
  • Pour one cup of water into the bottom of the IP and set the trivet in the bottom.
  • Spray the cups with cooking spray and fill each with a bit less than 1/4 cup of egg mixture, then add bacon.
  • Cover each filled egg pan with its silicone lid and stack the pans into the IP.
  • Position IP lid, seal vent, and cook on low pressure for 10 minutes. (Pot will take a while to come up to pressure before the countdown starts.)
  • Let pressure release naturally for five minutes before performing a manual release.
Adapted from Starbucks.

Nutrition

Serving: 1, Calories: 83kcal, Carbohydrates: 1g, Protein: 6g, Fat: 6g, Saturated Fat: 3g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 3g, Cholesterol: 105mg, Sodium: 158mg

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Breakfast and Brunch
Cuisine: American
Tried this recipe?Mention @umamigirl or tag #umamigirl!

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Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

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About Carolyn Gratzer Cope

Hi there, I'm Carolyn Gratzer Cope, founder and publisher of Umami Girl. Join me in savoring life, one recipe at a time. I'm a professional recipe developer with training from the French Culinary Institute (now ICE) and a lifetime of studying, appreciating, and sharing food.

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