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Lobster Benedict is the pinnacle of elegant deliciousness. And yet it’s truly easy to make. Here’s how to do it.

lobster benedict with immersion blender hollandaise on a small plate with a fork
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Why we love this recipe

Lobster Benedict is perhaps the most extravagant variation on an already pretty special theme. I’m particular about my lobster recipes and don’t like burying this mild-flavored, jewel-like meat under layers of other ingredients. But here, the flavors work so well together that it just makes sense. This recipe:

  • Makes a beautiful, impressive centerpiece for a small brunch party, especially over the holidays
  • But hey, is ready in about 20 minutes 
  • Is a wonderful use for leftover lobster meat (or start from scratch)
  • Makes use of the easiest, most foolproof method for perfect Hollandaise sauce

What you’ll need

Here’s a glance at the ingredients you’ll need to make this recipe.

ingredients in bowls
  • You can use any eggs you like, but sourcing good ones makes all the difference in such a simple recipe. Nothing beats the gorgeous golden yolk of a fresh egg from a well-treated hen. I’ve devoted a whole section to helping you parse the details.
  • You’ll start with cooked lobster meat. Benedict is great when made with claw and knuckle meat, leaving the tails for other preparations — but you can use any parts you’ve got. You can buy it cooked or do it yourself.
  • Immersion blender Hollandaise sauce takes the guesswork out of the process. You’ll never turn back — I promise.
  • Not pictured: a couple of tablespoons of distilled white vinegar in the poaching water help the proteins in the egg whites to set beautifully while the yolks stay soft.

Sourcing eggs

The least-complicated (though often not the most convenient) way to source great eggs is to buy from local farmers whom you know and trust, either directly from the farm or at a farmers’ market or small grocery store.

If you’re shopping at a U.S. supermarket, things can get a little more complicated. Here’s a quick guide to the terminology that will and won’t help you choose the best eggs you can afford.

Words that mean something

  • Organic
  • Pastured (best) or free-range
  • USDA A or AA
  • Certified Humane or Animal Welfare Approved seals

Words that don’t mean anything

  • Natural (anything can be called natural)
  • Vegetarian-fed (chickens are natural omnivores)
  • No added hormones (this is required by the government)
  • Antibiotic-free (chickens are rarely medicated with antibiotics)

How to make it

Here’s an overview of what you’ll do to make lobster Benedict. You can see the steps in action in the video that accompanies this post, and get all the details in the recipe card below.

step by step
  1. Toast and butter the English muffins. Meanwhile, bring a pan of water to a boil, reduce to a bare simmer, and add the vinegar.
  2. Carefully slide in each egg and poach for four minutes.
  3. Arrange some lobster meat on top of each muffin half and top with an egg.
  4. Top with plenty of Hollandaise, snipped chives, and pepper, and serve. That’s it!

Expert tips and FAQs

Can I make this recipe in advance? What about leftovers?

This recipe is quick to make and at its best right off the stovetop, so I don’t recommend making it in advance.

That said, you may be surprised to learn that you can make poached eggs a day in advance, store them submerged in cold water in the fridge and simply reheat in a pan of barely simmering water for about a minute right before serving. Restaurants sometimes use this technique, and if you’re cooking for a large crowd, it’s a good one to keep in your back pocket.

Hollandaise will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for 24 hours. Reheat gently so the sauce doesn’t break.

More favorite Eggs Benedict variations

lobster benedict with immersion blender hollandaise on a small plate with a fork

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lobster benedict with immersion blender hollandaise on a small plate with a fork
5 from 1 vote

Lobster Benedict

By Carolyn Gratzer Cope
Lobster Benedict is the pinnacle of elegant deliciousness. And yet it's truly easy to make. Here's how to do it.
Prep: 10 minutes
Cook: 10 minutes
Total: 20 minutes
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Ingredients 

  • 4 English muffins
  • 4 tablespoons (56 grams) butter
  • 2 pounds (907 grams) cooked lobster meat
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) distilled white vinegar
  • 8 eggs
  • 1 batch immersion blender Hollandaise sauce
  • Snipped chives, to garnish
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Instructions 

  • Split the English muffins and toast to your liking. (Lightly toasted, gently crisp on the outside and tender inside if you're looking for a recommendation.) Divide among 4 plates.
  • Butter each muffin half while still hot and arrange some of the lobster meat on top. 
  • To poach the eggs, fill a wide sauté pan halfway with water. (A pan like this is ideal.) Add vinegar and bring water to a brisk simmer, then reduce heat so the water is virtually still.
  • Crack each egg into a small bowl and tip carefully into the water, submerging the bowl a bit as you pour. I like to add the eggs in a clockwise circle starting near the handle so I remember in which order to remove them for even cooking.
  • Cook undisturbed for four minutes, until whites are set and yolks are runny.
  • Remove eggs from pan with a strainer spoon (something like this). Gently place eggs on a paper towel-lined plate and dab the tops to remove excess water. Cut away any scraggly whites if you like.
  • While the eggs poach, make the Hollandaise.
  • To serve, place a poached egg over each English muffin half and spoon some Hollandaise sauce overtop.
  • Garnish with plenty of snipped chives and freshly ground black pepper. Serve right away

Notes

  1. You'll start with cooked lobster meat. Benedict is great when made with claw and knuckle meat, leaving the tails for other preparations — but you can use any parts you've got. You can buy it cooked or do it yourself.
  2. A couple of tablespoons of distilled white vinegar in the poaching water help the proteins in the egg whites to set beautifully while the yolks stay soft.
  3. You can use any eggs you like, but sourcing good ones makes all the difference in such a simple recipe. Nothing beats the gorgeous golden yolk of a fresh egg from a well-treated hen. I've devoted a whole section to helping you parse the details.
  4. Immersion blender Hollandaise sauce takes the guesswork out of the process. You'll never turn back — I promise.
  5. This recipe is quick to make and at its best right off the stovetop, so I don't recommend making it in advance. That said, you may be surprised to learn that you can make poached eggs a day in advance, store them submerged in cold water in the fridge and simply reheat in a pan of barely simmering water for about a minute right before serving. Restaurants sometimes use this technique, and if you're cooking for a large crowd, it's a good one to keep in your back pocket.Hollandaise will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for 24 hours. Reheat gently so the sauce doesn't break.

Nutrition

Serving: 1, Calories: 352kcal, Carbohydrates: 28g, Protein: 23g, Fat: 15g, Saturated Fat: 6g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 8g, Cholesterol: 424mg, Sodium: 585mg, Fiber: 2g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Breakfast and Brunch
Cuisine: American
Tried this recipe?Mention @umamigirl or tag #umamigirl!

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

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About Carolyn Gratzer Cope

Hi there, I'm Carolyn Gratzer Cope, founder and publisher of Umami Girl. Join me in savoring life, one recipe at a time. I'm a professional recipe developer with training from the French Culinary Institute (now ICE) and a lifetime of studying, appreciating, and sharing food.

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