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Here’s how to level up your scrambled egg sandwich and make it into something really special. Follow the recipe exactly, or use it as a guide for your own creations.

a scrambled egg sandwich on a toasted ciabatta roll
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Why we love this recipe

Can we please begin by conceding that, as a woman of Italian-American heritage who’s lived most of my life in New Jersey, I know from breakfast sandwiches. (Thanks, friend. It’s a real niche.) That’s why I hope you’ll accompany me on this short journey from scrambled egg sandwich to something similar, yet vastly improved, that you may not have even known you were looking for.

This recipe is:

  • Savory, balanced, and living its best life
  • Equally great as breakfast for one or breezy spring and summer party fare
  • Make-ahead friendly, and portable, to boot — hello, picnics
  • Accommodating — swap the elements in and out according to my suggestions or your own preferences
  • Ready to be made from scratch according to the detailed instructions below, or assembled from your spare parts

I first published this recipe here in 2019. I’ve since updated the post for clarity, but the recipe remains the same.

What you’ll need

Here’s a glance at the ingredients you’ll need to make this recipe.

ingredients on plates

The eggs

  • My favorite way to level up a scrambled egg sandwich is to use a frittata. This move lets you incorporate multiple layers of flavor into the eggs, provides the perfect texture for a sandwich, and turns this into a wildly make-ahead-friendly situation.
  • Here I’ve pictured a big slice of a bacon and cheddar frittata, and I’m including the details for this version in the recipe card below. But the beauty is that you can make absolutely any kind you like.
  • Here’s everything you need to know about how to make a great frittata, with some of my favorite recipes linked too.
  • If you’d rather use scrambled eggs, I’ve got ya — please refer to the FAQ section below.

The other elements

  • I like to use a nice ciabatta roll, which I’ll toast lightly. Baguette segments work beautifully, too. If you have another favorite roll, you could use that instead. A frittata will stand up to crusty bread and also jibe well with a softer style.
  • Properly sliced prosciutto should be on the thin side but not so thin that it falls apart. Use any variety that you enjoy eating. This element is optional, so simply leave it out if you don’t want to include it for any reason. That said, it’s such an easy way to make a sandwich really shine. (So is smoked salmon, in case you’d rather use that.)
  • For the greens, you’ve got options. To prove it, here I’ve pictured some frisée plucked from one of my favorite salads. You can use anything from leaf lettuce to arugula to a lightly dressed salad. Or swap in juicy slices of perfectly ripe tomato if they’re in season.
  • Use a really good-quality butter if you can. Here and virtually everywhere, I start with a cultured, salted butter from grass-fed cows. This sounds fancy but doesn’t have to be. Kerrygold, for example, is sold in most supermarkets at a reasonable price.

How to make it

Here’s an overview of what you’ll do to make a leveled-up scrambled egg sandwich. You can see the steps in action in the video that accompanies this post, and get all the details in the recipe card below.

step by step
  1. Split the roll, toast it lightly if you like, and butter both sides.
  2. Layer on the prosciutto and the frittata.
  3. Top with greens, close the sandwich, and cut in half.
  4. Serve right away, or wrap and take it with you. That’s it!
Easy Picnic Food Frittata Sandwich | Umami Girl-2

Expert tips and FAQs

Do I have to make this sandwich with a frittata?

Nope! You can make it with regular scrambled eggs if you like. Here’s my recipe for perfect American-style scrambled eggs, which are your best bet for a sandwich. I’d recommend a softer bread style if you’re not using a frittata. Anything from a Kaiser roll to brioche to a croissant will work nicely.

Can I make this recipe in advance? What about leftovers?

You can make the frittata up to a week in advance and store in an airtight container in the fridge. Assemble the sandwiches on the day you plan to serve them. If not serving right away, wrap well and store at cool room temperature.

Leftover assembled sandwiches will be fine for about 24 hours.

More favorite simple sandwiches

a scrambled egg sandwich on a toasted ciabatta roll

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a scrambled egg sandwich on a toasted ciabatta roll
4.84 from 6 votes

Scrambled Egg Sandwich

By Carolyn Gratzer Cope
Here's how to level up your scrambled egg sandwich and make it into something really special. Follow the recipe exactly, or use it as a guide for your own creations.
Prep: 15 minutes
Total: 15 minutes
Want to save this recipe?
Enter your email and I’ll send it to your inbox. Plus get great new recipes every week!
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Ingredients 

For the frittata

  • 10 ounces (283 grams) bacon
  • 4 ounces (113 grams) extra-sharp cheddar
  • 8 eggs
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) heavy cream
  • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 2 tablespoons (28 grams) butter or reserved bacon fat
  • 1 medium shallot, minced

For the sandwiches

  • 4 ciabatta rolls
  • 6 tablespoons (84 grams) butter
  • 8 ounces (227 grams) thinly sliced prosciutto
  • Four small handfuls leafy greens

Instructions 

Make the frittata

  • Preheat oven to 375°F with a rack in the center.
  • Cut the bacon into bite-sized pieces. (I like to use kitchen shears for easy cleanup.) Place into a cold 10-inch skillet that's oven-safe.
  • Set skillet over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until fat is rendered and bacon is lightly crisped.
  • While bacon cooks, shred the cheddar on the large holes of a box grater. Crack the eggs into a medium mixing bowl. Add cream, salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Whisk until homogenous.
  • Transfer bacon to paper towels to drain.
  • Clean the skillet, reserving two tablespoons bacon fat if you would like.
  • Set cleaned skillet back over medium heat. Add butter or reserved bacon fat and minced shallot.
  • Cook, stirring frequently, until shallot is tender.
  • Pour egg mixture into skillet. Sprinkle evenly with bacon and cheddar.
  • By this point the frittata will have begun to set underneath. Transfer from stovetop to oven.
  • Bake until puffed and just set throughout, about 12 minutes.
  • Let cool slightly in pan, then use a spatula to ensure frittata releases from pan and slide onto a cutting board.
  • Cut into four pieces.

Make the sandwiches

  • Split each roll in half. Toast lightly if you like.
  • Spread each half with about 3/4 tablespoon of butter.
  • Drape prosciutto evenly over buttered rolls.
  • Place a slice of frittata onto each bottom half.
  • Top with greens.
  • Close each sandwich and cut in half.

Notes

  1. My favorite way to level up a scrambled egg sandwich is to use a frittata. This move lets you incorporate multiple layers of flavor into the eggs, provides the perfect texture for a sandwich, and turns this into a wildly make-ahead-friendly situation. 
  2. If you’d rather make a different frittata, here’s everything you need to know about how to make a great one, with some more of my favorite recipes linked, too.
  3. If you’d rather not make a frittata, you can absolutely make this sandwich with regular scrambled eggs. Here's my recipe for perfect American-style scrambled eggs, which are your best bet for a sandwich. I'd recommend a softer bread style if you're not using a frittata. Anything from a Kaiser roll to brioche to a croissant will work nicely.
  4. I like to use a nice ciabatta roll, which I'll toast lightly. Baguette segments work beautifully, too. If you have another favorite roll, you could use that instead. A frittata will stand up to crusty bread and also jibe well with a softer style.
  5. Properly sliced prosciutto should be on the thin side but not so thin that it falls apart. Use any variety that you enjoy eating. This element is optional, so simply leave it out if you don't want to include it for any reason. That said, it's such an easy way to make a sandwich really shine.
  6. For the greens, you've got options. To prove it, here I've pictured some frisée plucked from one of my favorite salads. You can use anything from leaf lettuce to arugula to a lightly dressed salad. Or swap in juicy slices of perfectly ripe tomato if they're in season.
  7. Use a really good-quality butter if you can. Here and virtually everywhere, I start with a cultured, salted butter from grass-fed cows. This sounds fancy but doesn't have to be. Kerrygold, for example, is sold in most supermarkets at a reasonable price.
  8. You can make the frittata up to a week in advance and store in an airtight container in the fridge. Assemble the sandwiches on the day you plan to serve them. If not serving right away, wrap well and store at cool room temperature. Leftover assembled sandwiches will be fine for about 24 hours.

Nutrition

Calories: 445kcal, Carbohydrates: 68.3g, Protein: 19.3g, Fat: 12.9g, Fiber: 10.7g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Sandwiches
Cuisine: American
Tried this recipe?Mention @umamigirl or tag #umamigirl!

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

Hungry for More?
Subscribe to Umami Girl's email updates, and follow along on Instagram.
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

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About Carolyn Gratzer Cope

Hi there, I'm Carolyn Gratzer Cope, founder and publisher of Umami Girl. Join me in savoring life, one recipe at a time. I'm a professional recipe developer with training from the French Culinary Institute (now ICE) and a lifetime of studying, appreciating, and sharing food.

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