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This asparagus galette with jammy leeks, ricotta, and burrata is one part rustic, one part elegant, and 100% raucous celebration of spring.

an asparagus galette with jammy leeks, ricotta, and burrata made with savory tart dough
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Why we love this recipe

This breezy asparagus galette is so generously layered with some of my favorite ingredients that I could equally have named it a “ricotta burrata crostata” or a “jammy leek and parmesan tart.” Whatever you call it, it’s an equally good way to infuse a spring party with a bit of casual elegance — or just use up an overabundant farmers’ market haul. It’s got:

  • A buttery, flaky crust that’s basically just the world’s most delicious garden shovel
  • Three types of cheese working in perfect harmony
  • A wild abundance of spring vegetables, cooked to perfection

All that, and it’s way easier than it looks. The crust only takes a few seconds of pulsing in the food processor followed by an hour of chill time in the fridge, during which you can read a good book or sip on an Aperol Spritz or, ideally, both.

I think tart crusts — even rustic ones that invite imperfection — require a little bit of self-trust and bravery, too, if we’re being perfectly honest. A novel and an aperitif can help with that, as well. (Or you can just refer to this post for my best tips on how to make savory tart dough.)

I first published this recipe here back in 2018. I’ve since updated the post for clarity, but the recipe remains the same.

What you’ll need

Here’s a glance at the ingredients you’ll need to make this recipe.

For the crust

ingredients
  • I like to use a combination of all-purpose flour and whole wheat pastry flour, which is tender and light but also full of nutty, nuanced flavor (and a little bit more nutritive value, to boot). You can use the full amount of all-purpose flour if you’d rather.
  • Use a really good-quality salted butter if you can. Here and virtually everywhere, I start with a cultured butter from grass-fed cows. This sounds fancy but doesn’t have to be. Kerrygold, for example, is sold in most supermarkets at a reasonable price. Whatever you use, keep it nice and cold. If using unsalted butter, add ½ teaspoon fine sea salt to the mix.
  • Beyond that, all you need is ice water. The amount will vary a bit depending on environmental conditions. You’ll use just enough to make the dough come together without crumbling.

For the filling

ingredients in bowls
  • Leeks have a mild, complex flavor. By the end of cooking time they’ll be jammy and irresistible. Pay attention to the prep instructions in the recipe card below — it’s easy, but there are a couple of tips that make all the difference.
  • I like to make this tart with delicate pencil-thin asparagus if possible. They look a little bit more inviting and cook thoroughly in the time it takes to bake the tart. If you can’t find extremely thin asparagus or just prefer thicker spears, partially cook them before adding to the tart by boiling for two minutes or so in well salted water. Dry well, then proceed with the recipe.
  • I like to use full-fat ricotta for the best flavor and texture.
  • Choose a good-quality, freshly grated parmesan or pecorino cheese. It adds a ton of nuanced savoriness. If it’s important to you that this dish be vegetarian, be sure to use a version made without animal rennet.
  • Burrata is an Italian cow’s milk cheese that’s gently firm on the outside and creamy on the inside. If you can’t find burrata, it’s okay to substitute fresh mozzarella.
  • Balsamic glaze is a syrupy reduction of balsamic vinegar. I usually have a bottle on hand to drizzle over everything from salads to steak to pizza, but you can also make your own by simmering some regular balsamic vinegar in a small pot until it thickens substantially.
  • Flaky sea salt makes a nice final touch. It adds a little bit of crunch and a delicate flavor that brings out the beauty of the rest of the ingredients. I like Maldon salt.

How to make it

Here’s an overview of what you’ll do to make a stunning asparagus galette. You can see the steps in action in the video that accompanies this post, and get all the details in the recipe card below.

step by step
  1. Cook the leeks in the butter until they’re tender and jammy.
  2. Roll out your chilled dough into an imperfect circle and brush with some olive oil.
  3. Layer on the ricotta, leeks, asparagus, and parmesan.
  4. Fold up the edges of the crust, brush with egg wash, and bake. That’s it!

Expert tips and FAQs

Can I substitute…

Almost certainly. I’d recommend having a look at this post, which gives you all sorts of easy guidelines, tips, and tricks for freestyling your own savory galette from the contents of your fridge.

Why was my crust…

Not so flaky? For the flakiest crust, don’t over-mix the dough, either in the food processor or by hand. Quit while you’re ahead and there are still some pea-sized pieces of butter in the mix. As long as the dough holds together when you pinch it, you’re good.

A little too crumbly? It could’ve used a little more water, and perhaps a tiny bit more mixing.

A little tough? You probably added a little bit too much water, which caused you to have to overmix it.

The key to making successful tart dough lies mostly in the bravery. But cold butter, ice water, and a light touch don’t hurt.

Can I make this recipe in advance? What about leftovers?

As with most pastry, this galette is best eaten on the day it’s made. If you have leftovers, you can store them in an airtight container in the fridge for a day or two and reheat with a short stint in the toaster oven before serving.

More savory tarts

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a rustic savory galette with asparagus and burrata made with savory tart dough
4.91 from 11 votes

Asparagus Galette with Jammy Leeks and Ricotta

By Carolyn Gratzer Cope
This asparagus galette with jammy leeks, ricotta, and burrata is one part rustic, one part elegant, and 100% raucous celebration of spring.
Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 1 hour
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total: 2 hours 20 minutes
Servings: 8
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Ingredients 

For the crust

  • 1 cup (120 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup (120 grams) whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 16 tablespoons (224 grams) cold salted butter, diced
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons 30 to (60 ml) ice water

For the filling

  • 2 large leeks
  • 2 tablespoons (28 grams) butter
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons (30 ml) olive oil
  • 1 ½ cups (375 grams) fresh whole-milk ricotta
  • ½ cup (60 grams) grated parmesan or pecorino romano cheese, divided
  • About 1/2 pound, (227 grams) pencil-thin asparagus (see note 6 below)

For the egg wash

  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) heavy cream or milk

To finish the galette

  • 4 ounces (112 grams) burrata cheese
  • Balsamic glaze, for drizzling
  • Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon, for sprinkling
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Instructions 

Make the crust

  • Place the flours into the bowl of a food processor fitted with the blade.
  • Add the cold diced butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse sand with some larger pea-sized pieces.
  • Add two tablespoons of the ice water and process for a moment.
  • Test to see if the dough holds together when you squeeze a bit with your hand. If not, add the remaining water and process again.
  • Use your hands to quickly form the dough into a ball. Then flatten into a disk between two approximately 14-inch square pieces of parchment paper.
  • Wrap in the parchment followed by a gallon-sized zip-top bag, and refrigerate for at least an hour (up to a week) before proceeding.
  • Remove dough from fridge about 20 minutes before you want to roll it out — you can do this as you start to gather the ingredients for the filling. 

Make the galette

  • Preheat oven to 400° F with a rack in the center.
  • Slice off and discard roots and dark green parts from leeks. Slice white and light green parts in half lengthwise and then cut each length crosswise into thin half-moons. Wash and dry very well in a salad spinner to remove all grit. 
  • Melt butter over medium heat in a medium nonstick skillet. Add leeks and salt and cook, stirring frequently, until jammy and tender, about 10 minutes. Adjust heat as necessary to prevent browning.
  • While the leeks finish cooking, sprinkle a little bit of flour on each side of the dough and then replace the parchment.
  • Using a rolling pin and turning the dough a quarter-turn clockwise every so often, roll the dough out between the parchment into a 14-inch circle (which should be about the same size as the parchment sheets themselves.
  • Remove the top sheet of parchment and slide the dough (still on the bottom sheet of parchment) onto a pizza pan or baking sheet.
  • Brush the dough with the olive oil, leaving a 1 ½-inch border around the outside. (In a few minutes you'll fold this part over to form a ring of crust around the ingredients.)
  • Spread the ricotta evenly over the dough, still leaving a plain 1 1/2-inch border as you add all ingredients.
  • Sprinkle half the grated cheese evenly over ricotta.
  • Spoon the warm leeks over the cheeses in an even layer.
  • Lay asparagus evenly over the leeks. (See note 6 below if your asparagus aren't pencil-thin).
  • Sprinkle with remaining grated cheese.
  • Working in 6 to 8 sections, fold the outer ring of dough over the filling to form a crust, pressing gently to adhere the sections together. I like to use the parchment paper to lift and press the dough rather than handling it directly, especially if it's gotten a little soft. In any case, don't worry about making it perfect. Rustic is charming, you hear? 
  • In a small bowl, beat together the egg with the milk or cream.
  • Brush egg wash over outer ring of crust.
  • Bake for 40 minutes, until nicely browned. 
  • While tart is hot, cut or tear burrata into pieces and distribute over filling.
  • Drizzle with balsamic glaze and sprinkle with flaky salt and freshly ground black pepper.
  • Cut into wedges and serve warm or at room temperature.

Notes

  1. In the crust, I usually like to use a combination of all-purpose flour and whole wheat pastry flour, which is tender and light but also full of nutty, nuanced flavor (and a little bit more nutritive value, to boot). You can use the full amount of all-purpose flour if you'd rather.
  2. Use a really good-quality salted butter if you can. Here and virtually everywhere, I start with a cultured butter from grass-fed cows. This sounds fancy but doesn't have to be. Kerrygold, for example, is sold in most supermarkets at a reasonable price. Whatever you use, keep it nice and cold. If using unsalted butter, add ½ teaspoon fine sea salt to the mix.
  3. Leeks have a mild, complex flavor. By the end of cooking time they'll be jammy and irresistible.
  4. I like to use full-fat ricotta for the best flavor and texture.
  5. Choose a good-quality, freshly grated parmesan or pecorino cheese. It adds a ton of nuanced savoriness. If it's important to you that this dish be vegetarian, be sure to use a version made without animal rennet.
  6. I like to make this tart with delicate pencil-thin asparagus if possible. They look a little bit more inviting and cook thoroughly in the time it takes to bake the tart. If you can't find extremely thin asparagus or just prefer thicker spears, partially cook them before adding to the tart by boiling for two minutes or so in well salted water. Dry well, then proceed with the recipe.
  7. Burrata is an Italian cow's milk cheese that's gently firm on the outside and creamy on the inside. If you can't find burrata, it's okay to substitute fresh mozzarella.
  8. Balsamic glaze is a syrupy reduction of balsamic vinegar. I usually have a bottle on hand to drizzle over everything from salads to steak to pizza, but you can also make your own by simmering some regular balsamic vinegar in a small pot until it thickens substantially.
  9. Flaky sea salt makes a nice final touch. It adds a little bit of crunch and a delicate flavor that brings out the beauty of the rest of the ingredients. I like Maldon salt.
  10. You can prepare the dough, wrap it well, and store it in the fridge for a week or in the freezer for up to a year before proceeding. If freezing, thaw in the fridge overnight before using. Roll out the dough, fill it, and bake your tart right before serving.
  11. If you'd like to make substitutions in the filling, I'd recommend having a look at this post, which gives you all sorts of easy guidelines, tips, and tricks for freestyling your own savory galette from the contents of your fridge.
  12. As with most pastry, this galette is best eaten on the day it's made. If you have leftovers, you can store them in an airtight container in the fridge for a day or two and reheat with a short stint in the toaster oven before serving.

Nutrition

Calories: 560kcal, Carbohydrates: 27g, Protein: 17.2g, Fat: 43.7g, Fiber: 2.7g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Savory Tarts
Cuisine: American
Tried this recipe?Mention @umamigirl or tag #umamigirl!

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

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About Carolyn Gratzer Cope

Hi there, I'm Carolyn Gratzer Cope, founder and publisher of Umami Girl. Join me in savoring life, one recipe at a time. I'm a professional recipe developer with training from the French Culinary Institute (now ICE) and a lifetime of studying, appreciating, and sharing food.

4.91 from 11 votes (11 ratings without comment)

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