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When you’re ready to take your game to the next level, look no further than our ultimate miso deviled eggs. These two-bite wonders are packed with satisfying savory flavors.

an ultimate miso deviled egg on a marble background
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Why we love this recipe

I built these ultimate miso deviled eggs with layer upon layer of wildly satisfying, umami-rich ingredients. They have tons of great flavor and a bit of a show-stopping look, too. They’re:

  • Crowd-pleasing
  • Make-ahead friendly
  • Vegetarian, low-carb, keto-friendly, dairy-free, and gluten-free
  • A truly easy addition to your next buffet

Find all of our gourmet deviled egg recipes here. They all work well individually (and fully dressed by the chef) or as part of an epic deviled egg bar.

I first published this recipe here in 2019. I’ve since updated the post for clarity, but the recipe remains the same.

What you’ll need

Here’s a glance at the ingredients you’ll need to make this recipe.

ingredients in bowls
  • You’ll start with a batch of perfect hard-boiled eggs. This reliable method yields eggs that are cooked just the right amount and easy to peel. The recipe card below includes full cooking instructions.
  • You’ll also need shiitake bacon. It’s easy to make and, if it’s new to you, may just turn out to be a total game-changer.
  • Kewpie is a Japanese brand of mayonnaise that’s creamier, tangier, and higher in umami than American mayo. It’s made with egg yolks instead of whole eggs and has a slightly thinner consistency. It’s worth seeking out, but you can use a regular good-quality supermarket mayo if you want.
  • White miso paste is made from fermented soybeans. It has a salty, sweet, and savory vibe and is among the most mellow of the miso varieties. Buy it here.
  • I like to use reduced-sodium soy sauce, which has all the umami but is a little less salty.
  • Mirin is a sweet Japanese rice wine that’s pervasive in cooking and in dipping sauces. It’s pretty easy to find in grocery stores these days, but you can also buy it here.
  • You can use regular or hot chili toasted sesame oil. This rockstar ingredient packs tons of sesame flavor and, in the chili version, the perfect level of nuanced spiciness.
  • Sriracha adds another layer of flavor and plenty of spiciness. The very small amount I’ve suggested in the recipe gives the eggs a barely perceptible heat — you can easily customize it to your tastes.
  • Gomasio (Japanese sesame salt, made with whole sesame seeds) adds a bit of textural contrast, a pretty finish, and another layer of flavor.

How to make it

Here’s an overview of what you’ll do to make ultimate miso deviled eggs. You can see the steps in action in the video that accompanies this post, and get all the details in the recipe card below.

step by step
  1. First you’ll cook, cool, and peel the eggs. Slice them in half lengthwise, and gently remove the yolks. You can make the shiitake bacon at the same time.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, mash the yolks with a fork.
  3. Add the Kewpie mayo, miso, tamari, mirin, rice vinegar, toasted sesame oil, and pepper and mix well until creamy. Mince and stir in 1/4 cup of the shiitake bacon.
  4. Pipe or spoon the filling into the whites. Garnish each piece with a bit of shiitake, a dot of sriracha, and a sprinkle of gomasio.

Expert tips and FAQs

Can I make miso deviled eggs in advance? What about leftovers?

You can cook the shiitake bacon and boil, cool, and peel the eggs up to three days in advance. After that, it’s up to you how to proceed.

You could make the filling and keep it separate, with both filling and whites tightly covered in the fridge, up to two days in advance and assemble at the last minute.

Or you could even make the deviled eggs entirely up to two days in advance and just hold off on garnishing until right before serving. Rewarm and re-crisp the shiitakes in the oven or toaster oven.

Leftovers will keep well in an airtight container in the fridge for a week, as long as they haven’t been left out on a buffet for a long time.

More favorite Japanese-inspired snacks

an ultimate miso deviled egg on a marble background

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an ultimate miso deviled egg on a marble background
4.55 from 53 votes

Ultimate Miso Deviled Eggs

By Carolyn Gratzer Cope
When you’re ready to take your game to the next level, look no further than our ultimate miso deviled eggs. These two-bite wonders are packed with satisfying savory flavors.
Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 10 minutes
Total: 30 minutes
Servings: 24 pieces
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Ingredients 

  • 12 large eggs
  • ½ cup (124 grams) Kewpie mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon (15 grams) white miso paste
  • 1 teaspoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon mirin
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ cup shiitake bacon, plus 24 pieces to garnish
  • Sriracha sauce, to garnish
  • Gomasio, for sprinkling

Instructions 

  • Fill a large pot halfway with water and bring to a boil. See note 1 below.
  • Arrange eggs in steamer basket, if using. Lower basket into water. Or use a spider strainer or large spoon to gently submerge eggs a few at a time until you've added them all.
  • Set a timer for 12 minutes. 
  • When the water begins to bubble vigorously again, reduce heat to maintain a brisk simmer so the eggs don't jostle around too much.
  • While the eggs cook, fill a large bowl halfway with ice water. 
  • When timer rings, pull eggs out of pot and plunge into ice water.
  • Cool for 15 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, if you haven't already, make the shiitake bacon.
  • Peel eggs carefully and give them a quick rinse under running water to remove any remaining bits of shell.
  • Slice each egg in half lengthwise and carefully remove yolks to a medium bowl. Mash yolks well with a fork.
  • Add mayonnaise, miso, tamari, mirin, rice vinegar, toasted sesame oil, and pepper. Continue mashing and blending until yolk mixture is creamy.
  • Finely chop the 1/4 cup of shiitake bacon and stir into yolk mixture.
  • Using a piping bag fitted with a large star tip or plain tip, a resealable plastic bag with one of the bottom corners snipped off, or a spoon, pipe or spoon the yolk mixture back into the egg halves.
  • Garnish each egg half with a piece of shiitake bacon, a dot of sriracha and a sprinkle of gomasio.

Notes

  1. If you have a collapsible steamer basket and would like to use it to lower the eggs into the pot, makes sure it fits snugly. A 7 ½ quart Dutch oven works well.
    Kewpie is a Japanese brand of mayonnaise that’s creamier, tangier, and higher in umami than American mayo. It’s made with egg yolks instead of whole eggs and has a slightly thinner consistency. It's worth seeking out, but you can use a regular good-quality supermarket mayo if you want.
  2. White miso paste is made from fermented soybeans. It has a salty, sweet, and savory vibe and is among the most mellow of the miso varieties. Buy it here.
  3. I like to use reduced-sodium soy sauce, which has all the umami but is a little less salty.
  4. Mirin is a sweet Japanese rice wine that's pervasive in cooking and in dipping sauces. It's pretty easy to find in grocery stores these days, but you can also buy it here.
  5. You can use regular or hot chili toasted sesame oil. This rockstar ingredient packs tons of sesame flavor and, in the chili version, the perfect level of nuanced spiciness.
  6. Sriracha adds another layer of flavor and plenty of spiciness. The very small amount I've suggested in the recipe gives the eggs a barely perceptible heat — you can easily customize it to your tastes.
  7. Gomasio (Japanese sesame salt, made with whole sesame seeds) adds a bit of textural contrast, a pretty finish, and another layer of flavor.
  8. Make-ahead options: You can cook the shiitake bacon and boil, cool, and peel the eggs up to three days in advance. After that, it’s up to you how to proceed. You could make the filling and keep it separate, with both filling and whites tightly covered in the fridge, up to two days in advance and assemble at the last minute. Or you could even make the deviled eggs entirely up to two days in advance and just hold off on garnishing until right before serving.
  9. Leftovers will keep well in an airtight container in the fridge for a week, as long as they haven't been left out on a buffet for a long time.

Nutrition

Calories: 76kcal, Carbohydrates: 0.3g, Protein: 3.2g, Fat: 6.2g, Fiber: 0.1g

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Snacks and Starters
Cuisine: American
Tried this recipe?Mention @umamigirl or tag #umamigirl!

Hungry for more?

Subscribe to Umami Girl’s email updates, and follow along on Instagram.

Hungry for More?
Subscribe to Umami Girl's email updates, and follow along on Instagram.
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

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About Carolyn Gratzer Cope

Hi there, I'm Carolyn Gratzer Cope, founder and publisher of Umami Girl. Join me in savoring life, one recipe at a time. I'm a professional recipe developer with training from the French Culinary Institute (now ICE) and a lifetime of studying, appreciating, and sharing food.

4.55 from 53 votes (53 ratings without comment)

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