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Chicken Poblano Soup with Corn, Black Beans, and Potatoes

Chicken poblano soup with corn, potatoes, black beans, and a lightly creamy broth packs a ton of balanced flavor into an easy meal. This recipe makes a pretty big batch. The soup will keep well in the fridge for up to a week, and the flavors only improve with a little rest, so it makes an equally good family dinner, casual dinner party centerpiece, or meal prep option for a busy week.

Chicken Poblano Soup with Corn, Black Beans and Potatoes | Umami Girl 780

Tip

Poblano peppers are usually mild and flavorful, but test your batch for heat, because once in a while they get a little fiery.

What we love about our chicken poblano soup recipe

This easy soup recipe is flavorful and nutritious, and yet is made mostly from pantry and freezer ingredients, along with vegetables you’re likely to have in the house. We get our chicken from Butcher Box and almost always have some in the freezer, and frozen corn works perfectly here.

As with many soups and stews, the flavors only get better over the course of a few days, so it’s make-ahead friendly (just see the detailed instructions about lime juice and cilantro below in the recipe card). This means you could make it for a casual dinner party, or meal prep it for a week of lunches.

Also? It’s just so damn good.

Chicken Poblano Soup with Corn, Black Beans and Potatoes | Umami Girl 780

How to char poblano peppers

  • If you have gas burners, simply turn the flame to high and use tongs to carefully place poblanos directly on the burner grates. Turn peppers occasionally until blackened all over.
  • Alternatively, you can do this on the grill or in the oven under the broiler set to high, with the rack as close as possible to the heat source.
  • Once poblanos are charred all over, place them into a large bowl and cover it tightly with a plate or a piece of plastic wrap.
  • Allow poblanos to steam until they are relatively cool.
  • Using your fingers or a damp paper towel, remove and discard the blackened skin.
  • Your peppers are ready to use.

What to serve with chicken poblano soup

Chicken poblano soup goes great with:

Proud Yankee Cornbread Muffins

A simple salad like this one, if you like

Maybe some brownies for dessert

Chicken Poblano Soup with Black Beans, Corn, and Potatoes

Inspired by a friend's lunch, this soup basically willed itself into being. I wasn't planning on sharing the recipe, but the very first incarnation was too good not to share. A note about poblanos: they're generally not very spicy, but occasionally they can be. Taste yours once you've removed the charred skin to make sure they're about as spicy as you think they are. If they're super-hot, you can use less than the recipe calls for. If they're disappointingly mild, you can include some of the ribs and seeds in the soup to amp up the heat. (Poblanos are very flavorful even when mild, so the soup will have great flavor even without that additional heat — but just sayin.)
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Additional Time 10 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 4 medium poblano peppers
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced small
  • 2 stalks celery, diced small
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1 pound chicken tenders (see note)
  • 1 pound Yukon gold potatoes, diced (no need to peel)
  • 1 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder or ground carne asada seasoning
  • 10 ounces frozen corn
  • 1 15-ounce can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 pint half and half
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Directions

  1. Char the poblanos by placing them directly on the flames of a gas burner, turning occasionally, until blackened on all sides. (If you don't have gas burners, you can char them under the broiler or on a grill.) Place charred poblanos into a large bowl, top bowl with plastic wrap or a plate that fits tightly, and let the poblanos steam until they're relatively cool. Then, using a damp paper towel or your fingers, peel off and discard the blackened skin.
  2. Dice peeled poblanos, removing inner ribs and seeds.
  3. In a heavy 5-quart pot, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onion and celery and cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly softened but not browned, about five minutes.
  4. Stir in garlic and cook one minute more.
  5. Add broth, raw chicken tenders, and potatoes to pot and raise heat to high until liquid comes to a boil. Then reduce heat to maintain a simmer and cook until chicken is just opaque throughout. (This should only take a few minutes.) Remove chicken to a plate or cutting board, cool slightly, and shred with two forks.
  6. Add salt, cumin, and chili powder, and continue simmering until potatoes are tender.
  7. Add corn and beans, along with reserved diced poblanos and shredded chicken, and simmer until warmed through.
  8. Off the heat, stir in half and half, lime juice, and cilantro. (See note.)

Notes

We use chicken tenders because they cook quickly. You can use a pound of boneless, skinless chicken breast if you like. They will just take a bit longer to cook through.

Chicken poblano soup will keep for about a week in the fridge. If you plan to eat it over the course of a few days, it's a good idea to hold off on adding the lime juice and cilantro until you're ready to eat each serving.

Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Nutrition Information

Amount Per Serving:

Calories:: 423 Total Fat:: 15.7g Carbohydrates:: 44.5g Fiber:: 9.1g Protein:: 28.9g

    Beet, Goat Cheese and Mint

    Prep Time 40 minutes
    Cook Time 15 minutes
    Total Time 55 minutes
    Serves Serves 4 to 6 as a side dish

    Ingredients

    • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
    • 2 tablespoons olive oil
    • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
    • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
    • Freshly ground black pepper
    • 2 pounds cucumbers (about 4 medium)
    • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chives

    Directions

    Place the vinegar, oil, sugar, salt, and a few grinds of pepper in a large bowl and whisk to combine.

    Slice the cucumbers into thin 1/8-inch-thick rounds. Place them in the bowl, add the chives, and toss to combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or overnight to allow the flavors to meld. Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed before serving.

    Preheat the oven to 450°F.

    1. Whisk together the first 6 ingredients in a large bowl.

    2. Spread a rimmed (18×13-inch) half sheet pan with the tablespoon of olive oil.

    3. Dunk the salmon in the miso glaze and arrange along one edge of the baking sheet.

    4. Next, toss the asparagus in the glaze and arrange in one even layer in another corner of the baking sheet.

    5. Finally, toss the bok choy with the remaining glaze and arrange in a pile in the open space on the baking sheet (don’t worry about piling it up a little—it will help them steam and cook through).

    6. Roast in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the fish is firm to the touch (if you’d like a little more color on the salmon, broil it for 2 minutes at this point).

    7. Remove from the oven, garnish with sliced scallions and sesame seeds, and serve.

    Notes

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    Vienna, Austria: Top 5 Things to Do, Digital Detox Style

    Step away from the smartphone and immerse yourself in the most livable city in the world. Here are our top 5 ways to truly enjoy Vienna, Austria, with lots more on the way (including detailed instructions on how to make these moments happen). Big thanks to the wonderful people at the Vienna Tourist Board for sponsoring this post. All opinions are, as always, very much my own.

    View of Vienna Austria from St. Stephen's Cathedral South Tower

    Vienna is my spirit city.

    Having spent a long weekend ambling through the charming Christmas markets with my husband and two young daughters in late 2011, I was pretty certain I already knew that.

    But recently I had the chance to go back to Vienna and pass a few soulful days pursuing some of my greatest passions on my own terms, and without too many digital distractions.

    And now I’m sure.

    I’m thrilled to have the chance to share a few highlights from that experience — because taking a little break from hyperconnectivity proved to be a great idea, and Vienna is an ideal place to do it.

    Belvedere Palace Vienna Austria Instant | Umami Girl

    The case for Vienna

    It’s almost embarrassing how many of my favorite things this city specializes in. Classical music. Great food, wine, and coffee. Stunning urban architecture laid out in a truly walkable, surprisingly green landscape. Expert mixing of classic and modern elements just like I strive to do in my own life and home. And, not for nothing, people who aren’t afraid to geek out with you.

    And the thing is, I think Vienna can play that role for just about everyone. You don’t have to be an orchestra nerd to feel well-cared-for there (though it doesn’t hurt.) Vienna excels — and has long excelled — in such a wide range of cultural, intellectual, and lifestyle pursuits that no matter what you’re into, it’s a rewarding place to spend time.

    The case for digital detox

    Because of all that, even though I’m normally as tied to to my smartphone as anyone, I was more excited than terrified by the idea of spending nearly a week exploring Vienna with nothing but a Lomo’Instant camera as my primary mode of documentation.

    It’s no secret that in the modern world, many of us spend almost as much time and energy snapping and sharing our travel experiences as we do truly experiencing them. It’s a little scary to think about stripping that layer of social proof from our hard-earned vacations, never mind spending time alone with ourselves. (“Pics or it didn’t happen” may be a joke, but Vienna’s own Sigmund Freud believed all jokes come from a kernel of truth.)

    Here’s what I found: that little instant camera, with its limited number of film sheets, its propensity for doing whatever it wanted, its slow burn as my photos came to life — it gave me space to think, and to feel. That sounds silly, maybe, but it was kind of a big deal.

    On the one hand, it forced me to really think through which experiences I wanted to have, and how I wanted to navigate them. On the other hand, it forced me to let go of most of the fine control I’d normally have over exactly how to share those experiences.

    Top 5 Vienna, Austria experiences

    Here are five of my favorite moments that opened up in between. I hope you’ll give yourself the chance to experience them, too, or to discover your own favorite unhashtagged Vienna moments.

    Opera Standing Room Only Vienna Austria Instant | Umami Girl

    Standing at the Vienna State Opera / Wiener Staatsoper

    I hopped off the redeye in Vienna on Friday morning and couldn’t resist planning a full day despite impending jet lag. So at 5 pm, a little more than two hours before the downbeat of Beethoven’s Fidelio, I picked up my book (to read while waiting), my scarf (a charming and useful tradition to claim my standing room place along the banister), and a mere three euros, and walked over to the opera house to wait in line for standing-room-only tickets.

    Regular tickets to the opera can be very expensive and often sell out early. But Vienna wants the opera to be accessible to everyone, so each night more than 500 standing room tickets go on sale shortly before the show. For three or four euros depending on the section, you can immerse yourself in some of the best music in the world, and have a fun experience, to boot.

    Bitzinger Wurstelstand Albertina Vienna Austria Instant | Umami Girl

    Eating late-night street food at Bitzinger Würstelstand Albertina

    I didn’t think my sleepy night at the opera could get any dreamier, but it did. After the performance I was starving, and Vienna knew exactly what I needed. Right behind the opera house is some of the city’s best street food. I indulged in a traditional grilled sausage (stuffed with perfect melted cheese, in case you needed more from life) and a pint of local beer before walking home along the gorgeous Ringstrasse. The city was still pleasantly alive and hopping, and I felt very safe walking alone — one of the many reasons Vienna is ranked the most livable city in the world.

    Vienna Philharmonic Standing Ovation Vienna Austria Instant | Umami Girl

    Sitting onstage at the Philharmonic

    When I booked my ticket to see the Vienna Philharmonic play Bruckner’s Symphony No. 2 in C minor and the world premiere of Christian Mason’s Eternity in an Hour, I had no idea I’d be sitting onstage. It turns out that in the Musikverein’s Grosser Saal, where the Philharmonic plays, some of the seats labeled Orchestra are actually behind the orchestra itself, where I’m well accustomed to sitting as a choir member but not as an audience member.

    In case you hadn’t figured out yet how deep my geek streak runs, I’ll say this. In March, back in New York, I had the opportunity to sing four performances of Mozart’s Requiem with the New York Philharmonic, led by the wonderful Austrian conductor Manfred Honeck. Manfred’s brother Rainer is the concertmaster of the Vienna Philharmonic. So that fortuitous seat on the stage at the Musikverein made me surely one of the only people on earth to have shared the stage (in one way or another) with both Honeck brothers over the course of the past 60 days.

    Realizing that while listening to the Philharmonic’s exquisite performance definitely makes the shortlist of my favorite life experiences ever.

    Naschmarkt Vienna Austria Instant | Umami Girl

    Shopping and snacking at Nachsmarkt

    Vienna’s Nachsmarkt has been a great place to shop since the 16th century (or so I hear). I can confirm that in 2019 it’s a great place to shop for fresh produce, grab a bite of prepared food from a wide variety of cultures around the world, and people-watch the heck out of a spring afternoon.

    I ate falafel, grape leaves, and cheese-stuffed hot peppers while watching the world go by, before walking over to pick up my ticket for the Philharmonic, and let’s just say I look forward to my next opportunity to do the same. (Yes there may have been a cheese-stuffed theme to my vacation, and I’m not one bit sorry.)

    Balthasar Coffee House Vienna Austria Instant | Umami Girl

    Reading, chatting, and relaxing at coffee houses old and new

    Vienna’s coffee house culture is a dream come true. Do you know the word gemütlichkeit? It’s one of those untranslatable German words that holds more in its heart than any single English word ever could. Gemütlichkeit is all about a mood of coziness and good cheer — similar to the Danish hygge — and that’s exactly what you’ll find at a Viennese café.

    I visited a sort of embarrassing number of coffee houses while in Vienna, both solo and with new friends. The cafés ran the gamut from traditional (like Cafe Sperl, where I observed tradition with a melange and an apple strudel) to hip and modern (like Balthasar, pictured above, and Fürth Kaffe in Spittelberg). Though each one has its distinct charms, they all share that casual, welcoming, collegial vibe that will make you want to return again and again.

    2

    How to Make Perfect Hard-Boiled Eggs

    Consistent, well-behaved hard-boiled eggs are easy to master with this simple method. We use a steamer basket so the eggs don’t crack, start the eggs in boiling water so they’ll peel easily, and simmer slowly for a slightly longer period than you might think so they’ll cook pretty evenly throughout. You’ll have sturdy but tender whites and yolks that retain just enough creaminess.

    Tip

    Plunging the cooked eggs into ice water prevents them from cooking further and makes them ready to peel in a flash.

    The perfect hard boiled egg for every occasion

    These eggs are great for eating straight with a sprinkle of sea salt and pepper (or hey, maybe a dash of mayo and sriracha, just sayin). They’re also great, of course, for egg salad, chopping onto a lunch salad, making a sandwich, and especially my favorite child I mean food right now, deviled eggs. (Try classic deviled eggs and a deviled egg bar.)

    How to Make Perfect Hard Boiled Eggs 780 | Umami Girl-2

    Here’s what you’ll need to make perfect hard boiled eggs

    And here's what you'll do

    • Fill the pot halfway with water and bring to a boil.
    • Arrange eggs in the steamer basket. Lower basket into water and cover pot. Set timer for 12 minutes.
    • As soon as water begins to bubble vigorously again, reduce heat to low to maintain a bare simmer.
    • Fill the bowl halfway with cold water and ice cubes.
    • When timer rings, pull steamer out of pot and tip eggs into ice water. Cool for 15 minutes.
    • Peel carefully and give a quick rinse under running water to remove any remaining bits of shell.

    How to Make Perfect Hard Boiled Eggs

    Consistent, well-behaved hard-boiled eggs are easy to master with this simple method. We use a steamer basket so the eggs don’t crack, start the eggs in boiling water so they’ll peel easily, and simmer slowly for a slightly longer period than you might think so they’ll cook pretty evenly throughout. You’ll have sturdy but tender whites and yolks that retain just enough creaminess.
    Prep Time 5 minutes
    Cook Time 12 minutes
    Total Time 17 minutes
    Serves 12

    Ingredients

    • 12 large eggs

    Directions

    1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. A 7 1/4 quart Dutch oven fits a steamer basket perfectly.
    2. Arrange eggs in a steamer basket. Lower basket into water and cover pot. Set timer for 12 minutes. 
    3. As soon as water begins to bubble vigorously again, reduce heat to low to maintain a bare simmer.
    4. Fill a large bowl with ice water. 
    5. When timer rings, pull steamer out of pot and tip eggs into ice water. Cool for 15 minutes.
    6. Peel carefully and give a quick rinse under running water to remove any remaining bits of shell.

    Nutrition Information

    Amount Per Serving:

    Calories:: 72 Total Fat:: 4,8g Carbohydrates:: 0.4g Fiber:: 0g Protein:: 6.3g

      Beet, Goat Cheese and Mint

      Prep Time 40 minutes
      Cook Time 15 minutes
      Total Time 55 minutes
      Serves Serves 4 to 6 as a side dish

      Ingredients

      • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
      • 2 tablespoons olive oil
      • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
      • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
      • Freshly ground black pepper
      • 2 pounds cucumbers (about 4 medium)
      • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chives

      Directions

      Place the vinegar, oil, sugar, salt, and a few grinds of pepper in a large bowl and whisk to combine.

      Slice the cucumbers into thin 1/8-inch-thick rounds. Place them in the bowl, add the chives, and toss to combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or overnight to allow the flavors to meld. Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed before serving.

      Preheat the oven to 450°F.

      1. Whisk together the first 6 ingredients in a large bowl.

      2. Spread a rimmed (18×13-inch) half sheet pan with the tablespoon of olive oil.

      3. Dunk the salmon in the miso glaze and arrange along one edge of the baking sheet.

      4. Next, toss the asparagus in the glaze and arrange in one even layer in another corner of the baking sheet.

      5. Finally, toss the bok choy with the remaining glaze and arrange in a pile in the open space on the baking sheet (don’t worry about piling it up a little—it will help them steam and cook through).

      6. Roast in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the fish is firm to the touch (if you’d like a little more color on the salmon, broil it for 2 minutes at this point).

      7. Remove from the oven, garnish with sliced scallions and sesame seeds, and serve.

      Notes

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      Brunch Cocktails: The Grand Prix

      We are lucky to count among our friends the cocktail expert Maggie Hoffman. Everyone should have a cocktail expert in their circle, don't you think? But really, if you can, get Maggie. More on that in a moment.

      In the meantime, please allow us to ply you with a truly delightful brunch cocktail featured in Maggie’s latest book. The Grand Prix was created by Morgan Schick for Villon, a restaurant and lounge in San Francisco’s Proper Hotel. The Grand Prix, which magically blends Campari, cold brew coffee, and fresh grapefruit juice, is very light in alcohol content and perfectly balanced in flavor, with fruity, bitter, tart, and roasty notes. Truth be told, given all the time in the world, I would never have thought to mix those ingredients together. This is why we need cocktail experts.

      And you already know we need brunch cocktails. 

      Tip

      Grab a copy of Batch Cocktails: Make-Ahead Pitcher Drinks for Every Occasion today. You'll be glad.

      Batch Cocktails: Make-Ahead Pitcher Drinks for Every Occasion

      Though Maggie and I share an undergraduate alma mater, I am…how do you say?…slightly too old to have met her there. Instead, we met as fledgling NYC-area food bloggers a decade ago, and then Maggie went on to become my editor at Serious Eats, where she founded the Drinks section. She now writes about bars and cocktails for publications including Food & Wine, Sunset, Wine Enthusiast, and the San Francisco Chronicle.

      Even better, she’s the author of two books that both bring sophisticated cocktail recipes and techniques into the realm of non-experts. We love both of these books, and, since we love to entertain but don’t love chaos, we especially appreciate her most recent book, Batch Cocktails.

      What we love about Batch Cocktails

      At its heart, this book gets you. It knows you want to throw a great party with a signature drink that your guests will want to make for their next party. And it really gets that sometimes making great drinks on the fly isn’t actually all that compatible with being a great host. These cocktails let you do most of the work ahead of time, and by the pitcher rather than glass by glass, so you can focus on spending time with your people.

      Maggie sourced the dozens of cocktail recipes in Batch Cocktails from her favorite bartenders across the country. The book also includes lots of practical tips for making the best possible cocktails. (For example, don’t use subpar white ice like I did in the photos, ahem.)

      These drinks — and this book — sit in a sweet spot at the intersection of expertise, approachability, and appealing sophistication. The cocktails aren’t ones you’d come up with on your own, but they’re mostly very accessible, and all of the recipes we’ve tried have been excellent and meticulously tested. These aren't just cocktails you can batch. In many cases they're ones you should batch, for the sake of consistency, proper dilution, and temperature control, as Maggie suggests in this New York Times article.

      The book is organized by flavor profile and also indexed by season, occasion, and ingredients. And in case you weren't sold yet, it's worth the price of admission for the photos alone, thanks to the talented Kelly Puleio.

      Batch Cocktails Maggie Hoffman | Umami Girl 780

      Why we love The Grand Prix

      This is one perfect brunch cocktail for spring and summer. It's peak-level light and refreshing, yet has a lot going on under the surface. Campari and cold brewed coffee (who'da thought?) contribute a broad spectrum of delicious bitter flavors, grapefruit juice provides both tartness and fruitiness, and a generous splash of tonic takes the edge off the bitterness while fizzing things up a bit. 

      After all these years, I'm pretty good at reading a recipe or a menu and understanding how the flavors will play out, but The Grand Prix involves a sort of alchemy that I had to taste to understand. It's extremely likable, but not in ways you'd predict by just looking at it.

      Kind of like my favorite brunch guests, actually. 

      The Grand Prix: A Perfect Brunch Cocktail

      The Grand Prix is a light, beautifully balanced make-ahead brunch cocktail for a crowd created by Morgan Schick for Villon in San Francisco. The menu there notes, "Like the famous car race: Tall, red, cold, and bitter. Or is that like our ex-wife?" I don't race cars OR have an ex-wife, but I do very much love this cocktail. It comes to us via our friend Maggie Hoffman's new book Batch Cocktails: Make-Ahead Pitcher Drinks for Every Occasion. In a million years I wouldn't have thought to pair cold brew coffee with Campari and grapefruit juice, but boy, it just works.
      Prep Time 20 minutes
      Cook Time 5 minutes
      Total Time 25 minutes
      Serves 12

      Ingredients

      • 2 1/4 cups chilled Campari
      • 1 1/2 cups chilled coffee or cold brew
      • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons 2:1 simple syrup (see note)
      • Pinch fine sea salt
      • 3 cups fresh grapefruit juice

      To serve

      • 3 cups chilled tonic water
      • 12 grapefruit twists

      Directions

      1. Up to 6 hours before serving, make the batch. Pour chilled Campari, chilled coffee, simple syrup, and salt into a 2-quart pitcher and stir to mix. Seal well, covering with plastic wrap if needed, and refrigerate.
      2. Up to 2 hours before serving, prepare grapefruit juice and stir into pitcher mix. Reseal and return to refrigerator if not serving immediately.
      3. To serve, whisk pitcher mixture well, or pour half of the mixture into a blender and blend for 20 seconds, then stir back into remaining pitcher mix. Fill 12-ounce highball glasses with ice and add 1/4 cup chilled tonic water to each glass. Top with pitcher mix and garnish each drink with a grapefruit twist.

      Notes

      To make 2:1 simple syrup, combine 1/2 cup sugar with 1/4 cup water in a small pot. Cook, stirring frequently, until sugar is just dissolved. Don't allow the mixture to boil. Cool completely before using. Store any leftovers tightly sealed in the fridge for up to a month.

      Recommended Products

      As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

      Nutrition Information

      Amount Per Serving:

      Calories:: 210

      Thank you, Ten Speed Press.

      Recipe ingredients and directions reprinted with permission from Batch Cocktails: Make-Ahead Pitcher Drinks for Every Occasion by Maggie Hoffman, copyright © 2019. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House.

        Beet, Goat Cheese and Mint

        Prep Time 40 minutes
        Cook Time 15 minutes
        Total Time 55 minutes
        Serves Serves 4 to 6 as a side dish

        Ingredients

        • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
        • 2 tablespoons olive oil
        • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
        • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
        • Freshly ground black pepper
        • 2 pounds cucumbers (about 4 medium)
        • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chives

        Directions

        Place the vinegar, oil, sugar, salt, and a few grinds of pepper in a large bowl and whisk to combine.

        Slice the cucumbers into thin 1/8-inch-thick rounds. Place them in the bowl, add the chives, and toss to combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or overnight to allow the flavors to meld. Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed before serving.

        Preheat the oven to 450°F.

        1. Whisk together the first 6 ingredients in a large bowl.

        2. Spread a rimmed (18×13-inch) half sheet pan with the tablespoon of olive oil.

        3. Dunk the salmon in the miso glaze and arrange along one edge of the baking sheet.

        4. Next, toss the asparagus in the glaze and arrange in one even layer in another corner of the baking sheet.

        5. Finally, toss the bok choy with the remaining glaze and arrange in a pile in the open space on the baking sheet (don’t worry about piling it up a little—it will help them steam and cook through).

        6. Roast in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the fish is firm to the touch (if you’d like a little more color on the salmon, broil it for 2 minutes at this point).

        7. Remove from the oven, garnish with sliced scallions and sesame seeds, and serve.

        Notes

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        A Fabulous Basic Waffle Recipe + Tips for the Best Waffles

        Our basic waffle recipe makes fabulously crisp, perfectly fluffy waffles. These waffles are equally good served simply with butter and pure maple syrup or dressed up with whatever next-level toppings you dream up. (And, psst…waffles are really good with bacon in the oven.)

        Tip

        These waffles need little adornment, but they're happy to accommodate if you're in the mood for more elaborate toppings. Try mixed berries and whipped cream for an easy variation on this simple theme.

        A basic waffle philosophy (a waffleosophy?)

        We think every cook should have a compelling reason to bust out the waffle iron on a regular basis — a simple, and simply perfect, waffle recipe made from common ingredients and basic techniques.

        Waffles should be special, but not because they’re complicated or crazy. They should be special because they’re comfortable, cozy, and exceptionally delicious. (Although, if you do want to get a little crazy from time to time, maybe try our gingerbread waffles or our savory cheddar and chive waffles, just sayin.)

        This is the recipe we turn to again and again, plus all our best tips and tricks for making great waffles.

        Waffles | Umami Girl Waffle Recipe

        Tips for making the best waffles

        Waffles — especially basic waffles — have so few ingredients and so few techniques that it really pays to put a little care into each element. Here's how to get the best results.

        HAVE INGREDIENTS AT ROOM TEMPERATURE, SERIOUSLY

        We know, recipes always say to have your ingredients at room temperature. Maybe you’ve gotten used to brushing off that advice. With waffles, though, it matters.

        Room-temperature eggs and milk will yield lighter waffles, and milk that isn’t freezing cold will also help the melted butter distribute better throughout the batter.

        TOP-SECRET HACKS FOR ROOM TEMPERATURE INGREDIENTS

        We’ll deny having said this if cross-examined, but in a lot of climates it's absolutely fine to leave your eggs and milk out on the counter when you go to bed the night before you plan to make waffles. Or, if you’re not thinking that far ahead, measure milk into a 2-cup glass measuring cup, separate the egg yolks right into the milk, and microwave on half power just until room temperature. 

        USE GOOD-QUALITY INGREDIENTS

        Good eggs, good milk, good butter, and fresh (or at least not ancient) dry ingredients will make your waffles taste as great as they should. We know everyone has different priorities when selecting ingredients, so we won’t preach. Just know that in a recipe as simple as these waffles, the better your ingredients, the better they’ll be.

        USE FRESH BAKING POWDER

        Okay, we’ll preach a little bit about baking powder, actually. Baking powder tends to hang out in pantries for ages, since a little goes a long way, and what are you, a professional baker? It doesn't last forever, though, so make sure to buy a new container every six months or so. Otherwise your waffles, pancakes, and baked goods won’t rise properly.

        GIVE MELTED BUTTER A MOMENT TO COOL BEFORE MIXING INTO WET INGREDIENTS

        If melted butter is too hot, you’ll risk scrambling the egg yolks, which is definitely not the goal. A moment’s patience goes a long way here.

        Waffles | Umami Girl Waffle Recipe

        WHIP THOSE WHITES

        We are not fans of overcomplicating basic recipes. Our wildly popular pancake recipe, for that very reason, does not require any egg separating or white whipping.

        However.

        Waffles are a different story. To achieve the combination of crisp exterior and light, fluffy insides, it really pays to separate your eggs and whip the whites to the stiff peaks stage, then gently fold the whites in right before cooking.

        WHAT THE HECK IS THE STIFF PEAKS STAGE?

        Stiff peaks means you’ve beaten your egg whites with an electric mixer (or by hand with a whisk for like 18 minutes if you insist, She-Ra), until they’re white and shiny. If you turn off the mixer and pull the beaters out of the egg whites, the little points formed at the top of the whites will stand straight up. Those are the stiff peaks.

        There is definitely such a thing as overbeating egg whites, at which point they’ll start to separate and turn grainy, so test early and often, and stop right away once you reach the stiff peak stage.

        WHAT THE HECK IS FOLDING?

        Folding is a gentle mixing technique that allows you to incorporate the egg whites into the batter without deflating them too much. This method will ensure your waffles are nice and light.

        To fold, drag the spatula through the center of the batter down to the bottom of the bowl, scoop up some batter with a sweeping motion, lift it up, and place it back down on top of the remaining batter. Repeat this motion, turning the bowl a quarter turn each time, until egg whites are streaked evenly and widely throughout but not fully mixed into the batter.

        Waffles with Berries and Whipped Cream | Umami Girl 780-2

        DON'T OVERMIX WAFFLE BATTER

        We can’t emphasize this enough: waffle batter should be a little bit lumpy and streaked with whipped egg whites. Perfectly smooth batter is an indication you've mixed too much. If you overmix at the first stage when combining the wet and dry ingredients, you’ll develop too much gluten in the flour and end up with tougher waffles. If you overmix when folding in the egg whites, you’ll deflate them and defeat the purpose of having whipped them in the first place. Just be lazy. It's the best.

        SPEAKING OF PATIENCE, LET THE BATTER REST WHILE YOU WHIP THE EGG WHITES

        A few minutes’ rest allows the flour an opportunity to soak up the liquids and gives the gluten a chance to relax a bit. 

        NONSTICK-IFY YOUR WAFFLE IRON, EVEN IF IT’S NONSTICK

        Give your waffle iron a quick spritz with nonstick cooking spray, or brush with a tiny bit of butter or neutral-tasting vegetable oil, between batches to prevent sticking. This waffle batter is well-behaved and easy to work with, but it never hurts to take a belt and suspenders approach to ensuring your waffles will release from the waffle iron easily.

        COOK UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN

        Waffle irons are individuals to be sure, but we find ours cooks these waffles perfectly when we set the dial about three quarters of the way along the route from light to dark. Your mileage may vary, so have fun experimenting to identify your own preferences.

        Waffles with Berries and Whipped Cream | Umami Girl 780

        Tips for freezing and reheating waffles

        Here’s some good news: our waffles freeze and reheat well. You can make a double batch, pop the extras in the freezer, and have a homemade breakfast on a busy weekday.

        HOW TO FREEZE WAFFLES

        The best way to freeze waffles is to place them in a single layer on a baking sheet and freeze until solid. Then you can place in a zip-top freezer bag for up to about three months. If your freezer doesn’t accommodate a baking sheet, separate waffles with parchment paper so they won’t stick together and freeze in a zip-top freezer bag.

        HOW TO REHEAT WAFFLES

        We adore our toaster oven and love to reheat waffles in it, whether from frozen or not. You can do this right on the rack on the toast setting or use a fancier mode depending on your toaster oven’s options. You can reheat frozen waffles in a regular toaster, too, or directly on the rack in a 350°F oven. It doesn’t take long regardless of which method you choose.

        Basic Waffle Recipe

        This is such an easy, flavorful basic waffle recipe. Follow the tips above and the directions here and you'll have a great, simple batch of waffles in no time. Keep them simple with a little butter and pure maple syrup, or jazz them up with whipped cream, fruit, or whatever next-level toppings you like. Their classic flavor works well either way. Makes about 8 5-inch by 5-inch waffles. Can be doubled.
        Prep Time 15 minutes
        Cook Time 15 minutes
        Total Time 30 minutes
        Serves 4

        Ingredients

        • 2 cups (240 grams) flour
        • 1/4 cup (50 grams) sugar
        • 4 teaspoons baking powder
        • 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt, if using unsalted butter
        • 1 3/4 cup whole milk
        • 2 eggs
        • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
        • 4 tablespoons (56 grams) butter, melted and slightly cooled

        Directions

        1. Have eggs and milk at room temperature for optimum fluffiness.
        2. Preheat waffle iron. (If yours has multiple doneness settings, try about 3/4 of the way from light to dark.)
        3. Sift together flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt into a large mixing bowl.
        4. Separate egg whites from yolks. Place whites into a medium mixing bowl and set aside for the moment. Add yolks to milk. (We like to use a 2-cup glass measuring cup to measure the milk and then mix together the wet ingredients right in the measuring cup.) Add vanilla to milk mixture and whisk together until well combined. Pour in slightly cooled melted butter and whisk to thoroughly.
        5. Pour wet ingredients over dry ingredients and stir together until just combined. Some lumps of flour are fine. Don’t overmix. Let batter rest while you whip the egg whites.
        6. Whip egg whites with an electric mixer to the stiff peak stage. This means they are white and shiny, and if you turn off the mixer and pull it out of the egg whites, the little point at the top of the whites stands straight up. There is such a thing as overbeating egg whites, so stop once you reach this stage.
        7. Scrape egg whites into the bowl with the batter and use a silicone spatula to gently fold the whites into the batter. (See note.) Leave some streaks of whipped egg white throughout the batter. Don’t overmix or the egg whites will deflate too much.
        8. Spray waffle iron with nonstick cooking spray (or brush very lightly with vegetable oil or melted butter).
        9. Add batter to waffle iron according to manufacturer’s instructions and cook until waffles are golden brown. Serve immediately, or keep warm in a 200°F oven while you finish cooking. You can place waffles directly on a clean oven rack or place them on a baking rack set into a rimmed baking sheet.

        Notes

        To fold egg whites into batter, drag the spatula through the center of the batter down to the bottom of the bowl, scoop up some batter with a sweeping motion, lift it up, and place it back down on top of the remaining batter. Repeat this motion, turning the bowl a quarter turn each time, until egg whites are streaked evenly and widely throughout but not fully mixed into the batter. Folding allows you to incorporate the egg whites into the batter without deflating them too much, so the waffles will be nice and light.

        Nutrition Information

        Serving Size:

        1 5-inch waffle

        Amount Per Serving:

        Calories:: 239 Total Fat:: 8.9g Carbohydrates:: 33.1g Fiber:: 0.9g Protein:: 6.4g

          Beet, Goat Cheese and Mint

          Prep Time 40 minutes
          Cook Time 15 minutes
          Total Time 55 minutes
          Serves Serves 4 to 6 as a side dish

          Ingredients

          • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
          • 2 tablespoons olive oil
          • 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
          • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more as needed
          • Freshly ground black pepper
          • 2 pounds cucumbers (about 4 medium)
          • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh chives

          Directions

          Place the vinegar, oil, sugar, salt, and a few grinds of pepper in a large bowl and whisk to combine.

          Slice the cucumbers into thin 1/8-inch-thick rounds. Place them in the bowl, add the chives, and toss to combine. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes or overnight to allow the flavors to meld. Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed before serving.

          Preheat the oven to 450°F.

          1. Whisk together the first 6 ingredients in a large bowl.

          2. Spread a rimmed (18×13-inch) half sheet pan with the tablespoon of olive oil.

          3. Dunk the salmon in the miso glaze and arrange along one edge of the baking sheet.

          4. Next, toss the asparagus in the glaze and arrange in one even layer in another corner of the baking sheet.

          5. Finally, toss the bok choy with the remaining glaze and arrange in a pile in the open space on the baking sheet (don’t worry about piling it up a little—it will help them steam and cook through).

          6. Roast in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the fish is firm to the touch (if you’d like a little more color on the salmon, broil it for 2 minutes at this point).

          7. Remove from the oven, garnish with sliced scallions and sesame seeds, and serve.

          Notes

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